The Report



[KINDLE] ❆ The Report ❥ Jessica Francis Kane – E17streets4all.co.uk A stunning first novel that is an evocative re imagining of a World War II civilian disasterOn a March night in , on the steps of a London Tube station, people die in a crowd seeking shelter from wha A stunning first novel that is an evocative re imagining of a World War II civilian disasterOn a March night in , on the steps of a London Tube station,people die in a crowd seeking shelter from what seemed to be another air raid When the devastated neighborhood demands an inquiry, the job falls to magistrate Laurence DunneIn this beautifully crafted novel, Jessica Francis Kane paints a vivid portrait of London at war As Dunne investigates, he finds the truth to be precarious, even damaging When he is forced to reflect on his report several decades later, he must consider whether the course he chose was the right one The Report is a provocative commentary on the way all tragedies are remembered and endured.The Report

JESSICA FRANCIS KANE is the author of The Report Graywolf, , a finalist for the Flaherty Dunnan First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction and a Barnes Noble Discover pick She is also the author of the story collections Bending Heaven Counterpoint, and This Close Graywolf, , which was an NPR best book of the year and a finalist for The Story Prize Her stories have been broadcast on BBC radio and have appeared in many publications, including Granta, Virginia Quarterly Review, McSweeney s, The Missouri Review, and Michigan Quarterly Review Her essays and humor pieces have appeared in Slate, Salon, McSweeney s Internet Tendency and The Morning News, where she is a contributing writer Her new novel, Rules for Visiting, will be published by Penguin Press in May, She lives in New York with her husband and their two children.

The Report ePUB ò Paperback
  • Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • The Report
  • Jessica Francis Kane
  • English
  • 28 June 2019
  • 1846272793

10 thoughts on “The Report

  1. says:

    After putting off this book for almost a year I finally decided to give this one a go This is such a gripping novel about a horrific incident that took place in 1943 in Bethnal Green tube station 173 people were crushed to death but nobody knew who or what caused it Although the characters in this novel are fictionalised the story is real I literally finished it in two hours because I could not put it down as it s so interesting and really beautifully written.

  2. says:

    Like Jessica Francis Kane s recent book, Rules for Visiting, The Report has a controlled energy that slowed my own In the beginning I stopped reading after each short chapter, not because I wasn t interested on the contrary, I was mesmerized but because I was sated I needed to metabolize and not think But as the tension built, I found myself reading beyond satiation, and somehow I handled it The Report is the story of the workings of crowds through a horrific historic event A very different Like Jessica Francis Kane s recent book, Rules for Visiting, The Report has a controlled energy that slowed my own In the beginning I stopped reading after each short chapter, not because I wasn t interested on the contrary, I was mesmerized but because I was sated I needed to metabolize and not think But as the tension built, I found myself reading beyond satiation, and somehow I handled it The Report is the story of the workings of crowds through a horrific historic event A very different book than Rules for Visiting, yet it shares a motif both books are essentially reports The events play out, they are reported, the facts accrue into a story And the art of this writing makes them into an experience that is hard to explain But let me try.The cover of The Report designed by Kyle G Hunter gives a metaphor for what happened to me as a reader, but for the longest time I didn t even notice it The picture is a dark AP photo Whether it is of the actual incident of people in an underground bomb shelter in the East End of London Bethnal Green during WWII doesn t matter It is what I envisioned But so subtle that you don t even see it unless the cover happens to be tilted up so the light hits it in just the right way is typeface superimposed onto the photo the report of this incident That is a perfect depiction of Kane s style There is nothing flashy, no sentences you can quote to illustrate poetic beauty, no obvious writer s technique Nevertheless, the writing enters your psyche, commanding that you slow down and see and feel every detail I swear my heartbeat synced with something larger that I surmise directs Kane s writing Likewise the elegance a meticulous elegance to every word and sentence is so understated you might miss it.I am obsessed with the responsibility of people in crowds and crowd movements, so I love the content of this book And I love this writing

  3. says:

    The greatest experience you can have as a reader is to entrust yourself to an author you have never heard of before, to read a book about which you know nothing, and to be rewarded for this leap of faith with a glorious read I have no idea why I put this book on my to read list nor indeed any memory of how it actually reached my bookshelf I suspect my wife despite her denials sneaked it in the to read bookshelf in an ongoing quest to widen my blinkered horizons The story is a sparse and under The greatest experience you can have as a reader is to entrust yourself to an author you have never heard of before, to read a book about which you know nothing, and to be rewarded for this leap of faith with a glorious read I have no idea why I put this book on my to read list nor indeed any memory of how it actually reached my bookshelf I suspect my wife despite her denials sneaked it in the to read bookshelf in an ongoing quest to widen my blinkered horizons The story is a sparse and understated account of the Bethnal Green Tube disaster where a stampede occured in 1943, when a crowd surged into the station seeking protection from German bombers In the ensuing inquiry the magistrate initially seeks to apportion responsibility but is forced into making decisions based not on the facts but on what he judges as the most healing of answers.I loved this book for so so many reasons The style is so crisp, a clinic on how to let the images conveyed deliver the emotional force without resorting to cheap gimmicks or purple prose I cannot remember a book since Alone in Berlin by falleda which so exposes the gut wrenching misery of war stripped of the faux heroics in the desperation of the civilian population The questions, of love, redemption, responsibility and class are posed freshly Ultimately what made this book such a meanigful read for me and so very uncomfortable is that it unflinchingly explores my greatest fear in life, losing my child The price I have paid for becoming a parent is that the flip side of all the love is a crippling fear that something will happen to your child The author uses this empathy to make the world all so vivid and the characters struggles became my struggles in a way that only a good book can bring to life

  4. says:

    This is the story of an accident that claimed the lives of one hundred seventy three Londoners at the entrance to an air raid shelter on the evening of March 3, 1943 and of how individuals, a community, and a government dealt with its aftermath It is a novel based on an actual incident during World War II Kane leads us to an understanding of the accident by following the conduct of the official inquiry into its causes and the preparation of a documentary on The Report of the inquiry thirty y This is the story of an accident that claimed the lives of one hundred seventy three Londoners at the entrance to an air raid shelter on the evening of March 3, 1943 and of how individuals, a community, and a government dealt with its aftermath It is a novel based on an actual incident during World War II Kane leads us to an understanding of the accident by following the conduct of the official inquiry into its causes and the preparation of a documentary on The Report of the inquiry thirty years afterward In coming to this understanding, we also begin to see that events of a disastrous or catostrophic nature are seldom the result of a single cause and thus defy the justification of laying the blame at any one individual s or group s feet despite the desire of some to find who s ass to kick The story also highlights the fact that, after such an incident, almost everyone involved wishes to hide some aspect of it whether for selfish reasons or noble whether for actual guilt or merely imagined.Despite the somewhat dark subject matter of the book, Kane s simple but direct prose makes the story very compelling Her characters are portrayed at their best and their worst The result is our beginning to wonder where on that spectrum we as individuals and a community would fall under similar circumstances

  5. says:

    This is a fictionalized look at an event that really happened 173 really did die, suddenly and unexpectedly, in a London air raid shelter during WWII So With a book like this, where you know Something Bad is going to happen, the question is only When The author teases things out, gets us invested in the characters and their lives, making note of tiny little details that might seem important or tragic later, and the suspense is all built up by the reader wondering when when when is this Bad This is a fictionalized look at an event that really happened 173 really did die, suddenly and unexpectedly, in a London air raid shelter during WWII So With a book like this, where you know Something Bad is going to happen, the question is only When The author teases things out, gets us invested in the characters and their lives, making note of tiny little details that might seem important or tragic later, and the suspense is all built up by the reader wondering when when when is this Bad Thing going to happen This book is absolutely nothing like that The Bad Thing happen so fast it s actually shocking I was like Wait, what It s happening I m not ready Brilliant, right True to life The Bad Thing happens, and we spend the book taking it apart, and seeing what happened to the people afterward It s a slow fade, rather than a cymbal crash The writing is absolutely stunning, and it s remarkable that Kane is able to find little moments of grace and beauty in a story that is so, so, so, so sad It s brutal I don t even know how a person writes a story like this A mother who lost one of her two children in the crush says I think I could endure anything I m not even scared If I died I would miss Tilly, but I feel as though I have a child on each side of an abyss now and death would be just crossing over to spend time with the one I haven t seen in a while If I can make an odd juxtapositional leap, thematically this book reminded me of Sondheim s Into the Woods In the midst of a huge and complicated argument about whose fault everything is, the Wicked Witch says No, of course, what really matters is the blame Somebody to blame That s what the characters in this book are struggling with as well When Something Bad happens, it needs to be one person s fault, in order for everyone to feel better and start putting the past behind them But it s never really like that, that never really works Ultimately, what s the benefit of assigning blame Difficult stuff to be wrestling with, and this book does a powerful and amazing job

  6. says:

    This novel was fascinating to me I love wartime set stories and this one drew me in because it s based on a true event I enjoyed how many themes were included guilt, blame, grief hindsight and how sometimes the truth isn t always best Just wish the novel was longer This novel was fascinating to me I love wartime set stories and this one drew me in because it s based on a true event I enjoyed how many themes were included guilt, blame, grief hindsight and how sometimes the truth isn t always best Just wish the novel was longer

  7. says:

    I took a chance with an author I d never heard of and a book that wasn t a bestseller while wandering around strand bookstore I wasn t disappointed.This book was a poignant reminder that when a tragedy happens there is no black and white The public wants a villain but there s alwaysthan meets the eye This was a very different, suspenseful tale based on a true story of a bomb shelter mishap that tells us that the truth is always complicated and a single source of blame is tempting but I took a chance with an author I d never heard of and a book that wasn t a bestseller while wandering around strand bookstore I wasn t disappointed.This book was a poignant reminder that when a tragedy happens there is no black and white The public wants a villain but there s alwaysthan meets the eye This was a very different, suspenseful tale based on a true story of a bomb shelter mishap that tells us that the truth is always complicated and a single source of blame is tempting but unfair in most senseless tragedies Even though this took place in 1943 I felt like this could have happened today

  8. says:

    The Bethnal Green Tube shelter disaster took place on the evening of Wednesday March 3, 1943 173 people died in a terrifying crush as panic spread through the crowds of people trying to enter the station s bomb shelter in the East End of London.However, no bomb struck and not a single casualty was the direct result of military aggression, making it the deadliest civilian incident of World War Two Jessica Francis Kane, read the full historical transcript of the enquiry into this, the worst civ The Bethnal Green Tube shelter disaster took place on the evening of Wednesday March 3, 1943 173 people died in a terrifying crush as panic spread through the crowds of people trying to enter the station s bomb shelter in the East End of London.However, no bomb struck and not a single casualty was the direct result of military aggression, making it the deadliest civilian incident of World War Two Jessica Francis Kane, read the full historical transcript of the enquiry into this, the worst civilian disaster of the Second World War, and she used what she read as the basis of her debut novel, a wonderfully vivid picture of people living through the event and its aftermath.She tells her story through a number of characters A mother who lost her younger daughter her elder daughter, who survived but would not speak the warden of the shelter, devastated by what has happened a young man who was delayed, who wonders if he might have been able to make a difference a vicar, looking for answers, wanting to offer comfort and supportAll of their stories are beautifully observed, with just the right details picked to illuminate those lives A hand held too tightly A wireless turned up to mask a conversation A breakfast left untouched The picture is clear, and it is moving without ever becoming sentimental.It falls to Lawrence Dunne, the local magistrate, to investigate and report on what happened A fundamentally good man, he wanted to understand, he wanted lessons to be learned, and he wanted to show understanding of what people had been through, of what they had to endure in wartime conditions.His story added another dimension Much is said about the human instinct to find someone to blame, about how those who are ready to accept blame often acceptthan they should, and about how apportioning blame is not really a resolution.And, maybe most importantly, I saw the lives of Jessica Kane s characters I understood their words and their actions, their strengths and their weaknesses They were flawed, vulnerable human beings.I saw the world they lived in, the terrible event they lived through and had to live with And I learned from it.Thirty years after the event a young filmmaker, whose family was affected by the tragedy, interviews Sir Lawrence Dunne for a documentary about the tragedy.Another dimension, it brought a different perspective, and it tied things together nicely, with a devastating final revelation.The Report is such a vivid human story, a beautifully written book that made me feel and made me think.And it is a story that will stay with me

  9. says:

    I was intrigued as to what an American author s take on this English wartime tragedy would be Her source material was a government commissioned inquiry, later published by HMSO in book form At first it seemed too dry, but actually her approach works very well The main character is JP Laurie Dunne, author of the report, but it also focuses on others involved in the case Without resorting to Spirit of the Blitz cliche, Jessica Francis Kane achieves a thoughtful and moving, if unsettling look I was intrigued as to what an American author s take on this English wartime tragedy would be Her source material was a government commissioned inquiry, later published by HMSO in book form At first it seemed too dry, but actually her approach works very well The main character is JP Laurie Dunne, author of the report, but it also focuses on others involved in the case Without resorting to Spirit of the Blitz cliche, Jessica Francis Kane achieves a thoughtful and moving, if unsettling look at the lives of ordinary people during World War II

  10. says:

    A compelling read Like following a thread you can t take your eyes from as slowly Kane builds tension Beautifully written with passages that are so good you have to read them again for the pure pleasure of the language I highly recommend it

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