Mémoires d'Hadrien



Tutto Mi Girava Attorno In Quella Sala Dove Le Teste Dei Buoi Selvatici Dei Trofei Barbari Pareva Mi Ridessero In Viso Le Giare Si Succedevano Qua E L Zampillava Un Canto Avvinazzato, O Il Riso Lascivo E Insolente Di Un Paggio L Imperatore, Posando Sul Tavolo Una Mano Sempre Pi Malferma, Murato In Una Ebbrezza Forse In Parte Simulata, Sperduto, Lontano Da Tutto, Sulle Strade Dell Asia, Sprofondava Gravemente Nelle Sue Visioni Ormai Vecchio, L Imperatore Adriano Scrive Una Lunga Lettera Al Giovane Marco Aurelio, Nella Quale Rivisita, In Un Aura Di Malinconia E Di Smarrimento, Le Vicende Della Propria Vita Pubblica E Privata, Interrogandosi Sul Suo Senso E Sul Suo Destino Padrone Del Mondo, E Tuttavia Acutamente Consapevole Della Caducit Delle Cose Umane, Egli Si Interroga, In Definitiva, Sulla Condizione Dell Individuo, Tanto Pi Tragica Nel Suo Non Poter Evitare La Morte E La Rovina, Quanto Pi Straordinaria E Preminente Il Caso Ha Voluto Che Fosse.Anche La Passione D A, Che Almeno Una Volta Gli Ha Illuminato L Esistenza Grazie All Incontro Col Giovane Greco Antinoo, Si Converte Presto In Lutto Per Il Silenzioso Suicidio Dell Amato E A Lui Non Resta Che Continuare A Vivere E Ad Adempiere Il Suo Altissimo Ufficio, Contemplando Con Sgomento Il Volto Deforme Delle Cose.Pubblicato Nel 1951, Memorie Di Adriano Uno Dei Capolavori Assoluti Della Letteratura Francese Contemporanea L Invenzione Narrativa, Il Saggio Storico, La Meditazione Filosofica E Un Sommesso Ma Pervasivo Lirismo, Si Fondono In Un Insieme Perfettamente Coeso E Originalissimo, Sostenuto Da Un Stile Alto E Solenne, Eppure Duttile Fino A Saper Rendere Con Plastica Evidenza Anche I Pi Riposti E Sottili Moti Dell Animo E Il Risultato Un Libro Di Grande Limpidezza Etica E Di Irresistibile Fascinazione, Che Continua A Insegnarci A Vivere, E A Morire.Mémoires d'Hadrien

The first woman to be elected to The French Academy, the multi talented personality of Marguerite Yourcenar was a novelist, essayist, playwright, short story writer, poet and translator She was an artist at reconstructing historical eras in the form of her novels Her novels, dealing with modern issues set in historical eras won her immense fame as a writer.The inheritance Yourcenar received afte

!!> BOOKS ✵ Mémoires d'Hadrien ✫ Author Marguerite Yourcenar – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 287 pages
  • Mémoires d'Hadrien
  • Marguerite Yourcenar
  • Italian
  • 15 December 2017
  • 9788481305432

10 thoughts on “Mémoires d'Hadrien

  1. says:

    There is a word that keeps popping up in my reading I d go so far as to say that this word is the underlying descriptor for the majority of my favorite books, in some way The thing is that I can t tell you exactly what that word is, nor what it means In Turkish, the word is h z n, In Korean, it is maybe something close to han, in French perhaps ennui though I am far from satisfied with that , and in Japanese, mono no aware None of these words mean quite the same thing, none has the same connotations, or the same cultural usage, really, but nonetheless they all get at something something they all peek and pry at from different angles, but do not capture entirely For me, the meaning of all these words is most exquisitely expressed in a Latin phrase Lacrimae rerum It is found in the Aeneid, and my favorite translation of it which yes of course means I will ignore all others is tears of things It is said by Aeneas as he gazes at a mural of the Trojan War, overcome with anger and sadness, going to a place beyond either of these emotions to the tears of things .This word. whatever its meaning, does not exist in English It needs several words to describe what it means in this language, and I think that some words need to be repeated and said in the right way to convey it in the same way But it still wouldn t work It certainly wouldn t work in America America is the anti this word America is founded on the promise that e...

  2. says:

    This book is the fruit of one of the most ambitious literary projects I have ever seen At the age of twenty, Marguerite Yourcenar conceived the idea of writing the life of the Emperor Hadrian She spent five years on the task, then destroyed the manuscript and all her notes Over the next decade and a half, she returned to the idea several times, and each time admitted defeat Finally, in her early 40s, she arrived at a method she could believe in, which she describes as half history, half magic she spent several years systematically transforming herself into a vessel for the long dead Emperor s spirit She read every book still in existence that mentioned him or that he might have read She visited the places he had visited, and touched the statues he had touched Every night, she tried to imagine that she was Hadrian, and spent hours writing minutely detailed accounts of what he might have seen and felt She was acutely aware of all the pitfalls involved, and used her considerable skills to efface herself from the process she did not want to breathe on the mirror She compiled tens of thousands of pages of notes and rough drafts, nearly all of which she burned The final result, the memoirs Hadrian might have compose...

  3. says:

    I was beginning to find it natural, if not just, that we must perish Our literature is nearing exhaustion, our arts are falling asleep Pancrates is not Homer, nor is Arrian a Xenophon when I have tried to immortalize Antinous in stone no Praxiteles has come to hand, Our sciences have been at a standstill from the times of Aristotle and Archimedes our technical development is inadequate to the strain of a long war our technical development is inadequate to the strain of a long war even our pleasure lovers grow weary of delight More civilized ways of living and liberal thinking in the course of the last century are the work of a very small minority of good minds the masses remain wholly ignorant, fierce and cruel when they can be so, and in any case limited and selfish it is safe to wager that they will never change HadrianHadrian ruled from 117 138 and was the 14th Emperor of the Roman Empire He was the third of five emperors that are referred to as the good emperors He had good men to follow and also provided a good example of leadership to those that followed in his footsteps He was the adopted son of Trajan Roman Emperors seemed to routinely struggle to produce offspring , and the first controversy of his ascension to power was that Trajan had never officially named him as his successor, but on a deathbed edict signed by Plotina the wife of Trajan, not by the Emperor, Hadrian was named to succeed He was uniquely qualified t...

  4. says:

    Convinced that the human being is immortal as an animal species, and finite as an individual being, Adriano, the most powerful man of the Roman Empire, exposes with minute details and beautiful metaphors the essential characteristics of human nature.Despite having absolute power, he feels incapable of modifying in the least the natural development of his own life With a lucid mind, full of wisdom and knowledgeable of the desires of human beings of all social conditions he regrets, old and sick, of the contradiction between his body and his mind.Reflect, comparing, if it has been worth playing the role of being omnipresent and all powerful, with the immense loneliness that for many periods of his reign he has felt countless times, at night in his rooms after participating in orgies, official acts, religious ceremonies or deciding the fate of life or death of another human being.All the earthly joys, the sexual experiences without limit, the trips by all the territory of the empire, the participations in the rites of diverse religions, the birth of a new belief the Christianity that considers inoffensive for being directed to the poor and slaves the knowledge of diverse cultures, his admiration for the Greek culture, his successes in front of the military legions, the official banquets, the eternal adulation, the conspiracies, the political a...

  5. says:

    This is something extraordinary If I was told this was the actual memoirs of the emperor, I would have believed it This is a remarkable book, both for the exquisite and well crafted writing style, but for the depth and solidity of the research, and how multifaceted and fascinating the character of Hadrian is It seems I have known him all my life, and I want...

  6. says:

    Through the mists of time, the clouds lift but only partly, always remain overcast , they never give up their deep secrets , and the myths will continue, such is history, such was the Roman Emperor Hadrian, of the second century, no Julius Caesar but who was Sill a very capable man born in Italica, what is now Spain, to a Roman family of landowners and Senators, they had left Italy centuries before and prospered His cousin Emperor Trajan, many years his senior, later adopts the young man, sent to Rome for an education by his family at 12, with a trusted guardian, the father had just expired at 40 The future ruler shows promise, studies hard and does well in the army he is fearless, against the enemy maybe even reckless, his men always cheer him, as a civilian too, a good magistrate in Rome, though like many men of his age spends his money foolishly, loving both men and women and goes into debt, this annoys Trajan greatly The tough old soldier Emperor, comfortable leading his conquering army, than playing the politician in the capital, it would be...

  7. says:

    In the notes at the back of this book, Marguerite Yourcenar tells us that in 1941 she stumbled upon some Piranesi engravings in a shop in New York One of them was a view of the interior of Hadrian s Villa as it might have looked in the 1740s I say might have because the famous Piranesi had a talent for adding interesting layers to his engravings of the monuments of Rome What his contemporaries viewed as a pile of crumbling ruins, took on new life in his rendering, imbued with the phantasms of his peculiar imagination Yourcenar, who had been researching Hadrian s life for many years, interprets Piranesi s version of Hadrian s Villa as the inside of a human skull upon which strands of vegetation hang like human hair She recognizes Piranesi s genius in conveying an hallucinatory echo of the tragic interior world of the Villa s former owner, the Emperor Hadrian, and she praises Piranesi s medium like gifts, his ability to be an extraordinary intermediary between the Villa and the Emperor When I had digested her words, it occurred to me that this is exactly how I d describe her own achievement in this book Hers too are medium like gifts she is an extraord...

  8. says:

    This ought not to work on a number of levels and ought not to be as good as it is A historical novel about the Romans there is so much temptation to go into Life of Brian mode at this point , indeed about one of their emperors Hadrian dominated Marguerite Yourcenar s life for many years with rewrites, abandonments, acres of notes and thoughts, and an immense amount of research including travel to places Hadrian had been The novel is in the form of a letter from Hadrian to his adopted grandson Marcus Aurelius It is in the first person Hadrian is in his final illness and is looking back over his life If you are looking for snappy dialogue then this is not the book for you, nor is there any action It is a series of musings, reflections, philosophizing and making comment as Hadrian works through his life The novel is essentially interior and Yourcenar does say why she selected this particular interior to focus on It stems from a quote she found by Flaubert Just when the gods had ceased to be, and the Christ had not yet come, there was a unique moment in his...

  9. says:

    Margerite Yourcenar s Hadrian is not only the Roman Emperor, citizen of the world and deified ruler, whose heart throbbed at the cadence of Greek poetry, whose resilient physique conquered the barbarian borders of northern Britannia, whose strategic mind enforced groundbreaking laws to regulate the use of slaves and to promote culture in the Pantheon, whose modesty silenced insurgent voices and whose excesses intimidated allied ones I have come to think that great men are characterized by the extreme position which they take, and that heir heroism consists in holding to that extremity throughout their lives They are our poles, or our antipodes Underneath the imposing greatness of the historical figure that Yourcenar pens with unfaltering dexterity, a moribund man exhales his last breath prostrated on his deathbed and confronts his contradictory selves Drowned in erotic ambiguity, haunted by idyllic remembrances of platonic love and superfluous infatuation, Hadrian drops the mask of formidable Emperor and shows himself as a vulnerable man plagued by his remorse, aggressiv...

  10. says:

    But books lie, even those that are most sincere The less adroit, for lack of words and phrases wherein they can enclose life, retain of it but a flat and feeble likeness Some, like Lucan, make it heavy, and encumber it with a solemnity which it does not possess others, on the contrary, like Petronius, make life lighter than it is, like a hollow, bouncing ball, easy to toss to and fro in a universe without weight The poets transport us into a world which is vaster and beautiful than our own, with ardor and sweetness, different therefore, and in practice almost uninhabitable The philosophers, in order to study reality pure, subject it to about the same transformations as fire or pestle make substance undergo nothing that we have known of a person or of a fact seems to subsist in those ashes or those crystals to which they are reduced Historians propose to us systems too perfect for explaining the past, with sequence of cause and effect much too exact and clear to have been ever entirely true they rearrange what is dead, unresisting material, and I know that even Plutarch will never recapture Alexander The story tellers and spinners of erotic tales are hardly than butchers who hang up for sale morsels of meat attractive to flies I shoul...

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