Margaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty



Divorced At Ten, A Mother At Thirteen Three Times A Widow The Extraordinary True Story Of The Red Queen , Lady Margaret Beaufort, Matriarch Of The Tudors Born In The Midst Of The Wars Of The Roses, Margaret Beaufort Became The Greatest Heiress Of Her Time She Survived A Turbulent Life, Marrying Four Times And Enduring Imprisonment Before Passing Her Claim To The Crown Of England To Her Son, Henry VII, The First Of The Tudor Monarchs Margaret S Royal Blood Placed Her On The Fringes Of The Lancastrian Royal Dynasty After Divorcing Her First Husband At The Age Of Ten, She Married The King S Half Brother, Edmund Tudor, Becoming A Widow And Bearing Her Only Child, The Future Henry VII, Before Her Fourteenth Birthday Margaret Was Always Passionately Devoted To The Interests Of Her Son Who Claimed The Throne Through Her She Embroiled Herself In Both Treason And Conspiracy As She Sought To Promote His Claims, Allying Herself With The Yorkist Queen, Elizabeth Woodville, In An Attempt To Depose Richard III She Was Imprisoned By Richard And Her Lands Confiscated, But She Continued To Work On Her Son S Behalf, Ultimately Persuading Her Fourth Husband, The Powerful Lord Stanley, To Abandon The King In Favour Of Henry On The Eve Of The Decisive Battle Of Bosworth It Was Lord Stanley Himself Who Placed The Crown On Henry S Head On The Battlefield Henry VII Gave His Mother Unparalleled Prominence During His Reign She Established Herself As An Independent Woman And Ended Her Life As Regent Of England, Ruling On Behalf Of Her Seventeen Year Old Grandson, Henry VIIIMargaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty

Elizabeth Norton is a British historian specialising in the queens of England and the Tudor period She obtained an Master of Arts in Archaeology and Anthropology from the University of Cambridge in 2003 and a masters degree in European Archaeology from the University of Oxford in 2004.Elizabeth Norton is the author of five non fiction works She Wolves, The Notorious Queens of England The History Press, 2008 , Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII s Obsession Amberley, 2008 , Jane Seymour, Henry VIII s True Love Amberley, 2009 , Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII s Discarded Bride Amberley, 2009 and Catherine Parr Amberley, 2010 2 She is also the author of two articles Anne of Cleves and Richmond Palace Surrey History, 2009 3 and Scandinavian Influences in the Late Anglo Saxon Sculpture of Sussex Sussex Archaeological Collections, 2009

[Reading] ➮ Margaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty ➶ Elizabeth Norton – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 255 pages
  • Margaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty
  • Elizabeth Norton
  • English
  • 04 November 2019
  • 1445601427

10 thoughts on “Margaret Beaufort: Mother of the Tudor Dynasty

  1. says:

    I really enjoyed this book and it was interesting to read about the real Margaret As a secret long time fan of hers, I now feel justified in believing there was so muchto this woman than is usually presented by popular historical fiction authors While this biography could probably be classed as history lite it was accessible, readable and informative While there are probablythorough biographies out there, this is a great place start.

  2. says:

    Margaret Beaufort Mother of the Tudor Dynasty reminds me a great deal of the non fiction history I just finished Jane Boleyn The Infamous Lady Rochford Both had as their subject an historical figure about whom only scraps of evidence survive to present day, and as a result have rather sparse material to work with As a direct consequence, specific biographic detail on their chosen individuals is somewhat scarce and meagre fare However, whilst Julia Fox padded out her work with vivid descrip Margaret Beaufort Mother of the Tudor Dynasty reminds me a great deal of the non fiction history I just finished Jane Boleyn The Infamous Lady Rochford Both had as their subject an historical figure about whom only scraps of evidence survive to present day, and as a result have rather sparse material to work with As a direct consequence, specific biographic detail on their chosen individuals is somewhat scarce and meagre fare However, whilst Julia Fox padded out her work with vivid description and supposition imaginatively engaging, however, questionably unacademic Elizabeth Norton sticks to the known facts, and this is a rather short work by comparison I would say it is a shade less engaging that Fox s biography, however its greater professionalism will please, and if you have an existing interest in Margaret Beaufort you won t find it difficult to get through this, smoothly written and easily readable as it is.Evencoincidentally, Norton, like Fox, makes but one single glaring error which unfortunately detracts from the work On page 83 she makes the mistake of referring to Dominic Mancini as a contemporary of Edward IV s wedding to Elizabeth Woodville in 1464 CE and repeats as fact, without even attributing it as having come from Mancini, the tale of Cecily Neville being so outraged at the match that she threatened to declare that her son was illegitimate Dominic Mancini was not a contemporary of that time and in fact visited England between 1482 and 1483 CE, around the time of Edward IV s death and Richard III s usurpation of the throne from his young nephews Mancini was not admitted to the royal court, and relied on London street gossip and possibly some unknown sources within the court possibly Dr John Argentine, physician to the princes in the Tower, who was known to speak Italian and who later joined the court of Henry VII Mancini s command of English appears not to have been fluent, and it is not clear how much he actually understood and how much was translated to him and may have got lost in translation This mistake on Norton s part admittedly set me on my guard whilst reading the rest of her book However, Margaret Beaufort is reasonably well referenced, citing endnotes and a thorough bibliography, and as an added bonus Norton includes all known letters written by Margaret in an appendix at the end, allowing us to read Margaret s own words.8 out of 10

  3. says:

    And, now I m back in my comfort zone The Tudors, and Margaret Beaufort is one of the most important members of that family, even though she was only one by marriage for a short space of her life She was absolutely interesting and amazing, the woman who certainly pioneered for her son throughout their whole lives It never fails to amaze me that she had Henry VII at 13, then from that time and on, she was basically a power mom who seems way older than that.The only downside to this is that ther And, now I m back in my comfort zone The Tudors, and Margaret Beaufort is one of the most important members of that family, even though she was only one by marriage for a short space of her life She was absolutely interesting and amazing, the woman who certainly pioneered for her son throughout their whole lives It never fails to amaze me that she had Henry VII at 13, then from that time and on, she was basically a power mom who seems way older than that.The only downside to this is that there isn t a lot of information about her She wasn t seen as very important because she was a woman, so I felt like I learned a lot about other people than her So, that was annoying But, that s how things are I just wished that Norton drew inprimary source material with letters to or from Margaret, because I m sure it s out there

  4. says:

    Find the enhanced version of this and other reviews at thing I appreciate most about this book is that Norton doesn t try to recreate Margaret s personality She hints here and there but it is always based on Margaret s own words or actions For example, Norton covers the intense feelings Margaret had regarding the early marriage of her granddaughter but she doesn t make assumptions about Margaret s emotions during her own early marriage to a man near Find the enhanced version of this and other reviews at thing I appreciate most about this book is that Norton doesn t try to recreate Margaret s personality She hints here and there but it is always based on Margaret s own words or actions For example, Norton covers the intense feelings Margaret had regarding the early marriage of her granddaughter but she doesn t make assumptions about Margaret s emotions during her own early marriage to a man nearly twelve years her senior It would be all too easy to say Margaret was a terrified bride, widow and mother by age thirteen but Norton resists temptation, restricting herself to the available facts and allowing the reader to come to their own conclusions It is a style I personally appreciate as I like forming my own opinions rather than being told what to think, especially when it comes to nonfiction.Factually this is a wonderful biography of Margaret Beaufort but it is a tough book to read The spelling reverts to old English at random Now I m reasonably proficient in old English but I found myself stumblingoften than I care to admit More than that, I found the formatting of the book difficult to absorb Norton frequently starts a paragraph but follows her thoughts through years ahead of where she started only to backtrack again with the next paragraph Again, I love that amount of information Norton compiled here but all the same, I found it hard to follow By and large I have few criticisms of the book beyond what I ve already mentioned Norton s work is wonderfully detailed in so much as the surviving records allow Fact heavy but well researched Recommended to fans of Elizabeth and Mary Cousins, Rivals, Queens by Jane Dunn

  5. says:

    I listened to the audio version of this book Despite the somewhat monotonous tone of the narrator, which might be offputting for some, it is worth reading through Not least because it serves to challenge a lot of popular misconceptions that have grown up around Lady Margaret recently propogated by works of popular fiction like The White Queen TV series and the novels it was based on Beaufort does not equal evil, or mother of Henry Tudor, super evil Margeret was actually known as being a p I listened to the audio version of this book Despite the somewhat monotonous tone of the narrator, which might be offputting for some, it is worth reading through Not least because it serves to challenge a lot of popular misconceptions that have grown up around Lady Margaret recently propogated by works of popular fiction like The White Queen TV series and the novels it was based on Beaufort does not equal evil, or mother of Henry Tudor, super evil Margeret was actually known as being a pious Lady and does not seem to have been a natural schemer During most of the period of the Wars of the Roses she seems to have kept her head down, and genuinely cared for her second, husband Henry Stafford Certainly she was dedicated to looking after the interests of her only son whom she gave birth to at barely 14, but it is, in some sense, hard to condemn a woman for being a dedicated mother in such circumstances Even in the midst of civil war, when her son, as rival claimant, was seen as an enemy of the state She does seem to have made some attempt at rehabilitation, negotiating a marriage to Elizabeth of York even before her father Edward IV s death Most of all, this was an interesting apprisal of a life and career of a fascinating woman a woman subject to many extreme and unenviable circumstances, who usually seems to have come out fighting Also a useful counter to the popular Tudor evil, Yorkists good conception of the period, providing anuanced view I am very tempted to purchase the Kindle or Paperback edition to add to my library

  6. says:

    Already have a book on Margaret Beaufort and have her covered via books on other Tudors and find her a fascinating biography Norton did a good job of laying out the bare bones of Margaret s life using many primary sources and quoting from them extensively Wouldn t say there was a great deal of analysis but there really isn t the need Margaret managed to survive and formulate much of her life in an era when women had little power let alone rights She did become a huge influence not in any Already have a book on Margaret Beaufort and have her covered via books on other Tudors and find her a fascinating biography Norton did a good job of laying out the bare bones of Margaret s life using many primary sources and quoting from them extensively Wouldn t say there was a great deal of analysis but there really isn t the need Margaret managed to survive and formulate much of her life in an era when women had little power let alone rights She did become a huge influence not in any official capacity to her son once he became Henry VII Have had my own mother in law issues over the years and can t imagine what poor Elizabeth of York had to go through with Margaret even ordering what cushions should be in Elizabeth s chambers Certainly a formidable woman

  7. says:

    I enjoyed this biography of Margaret Beaufort very much She was such an interesting woman with a passion for her family and a love of learning It was good to read about her actual life rather than the usual panto bad guy you get it many works of fiction It turns out that Margaret was an actual woman, a woman with beliefs and dreams, a pious, intelligent and brave woman Not deserving of that Mag The Hag monika that she seems to unfairly be given in recent times.

  8. says:

    It was okay, a bit on the light side but for anyone with only the basic knowledge this would be a great bio to get to know Margaret Beaufort better.

  9. says:

    This is a bit of a brisk read, as it is lacking in the supposition and literary devices that other authors may use while writing about historical figures This in itself will be pleasing to some as I have read biographies that were bogged down in parts by opinions and supposition.Some of what she did may have been questionable, but in a time where women had limited if any power, Margaret Beaufort did not do too badly for herself, although I can not help but wonder what things would have been This is a bit of a brisk read, as it is lacking in the supposition and literary devices that other authors may use while writing about historical figures This in itself will be pleasing to some as I have read biographies that were bogged down in parts by opinions and supposition.Some of what she did may have been questionable, but in a time where women had limited if any power, Margaret Beaufort did not do too badly for herself, although I can not help but wonder what things would have been like, if Henry VII had been born a female Same could be said of Edward VI, it is interesting to note what a huge impact gender can have on one s personal and professional expectations.3.5 5 stars

  10. says:

    Highly readable biography of one of the most underlooked but badass women from English history Norton uses Lady Fortune and her wheel as a metaphor for Margaret s story, a woman who by all rights should have been queen her son took half his right to inherit from her, the other from his wife She was a behind the scenes agitator for her only child, a son who eventually SPOILER alert became King Henry VII, the first Tudor king she was a spider who spun webs of intrigue and treason for her so Highly readable biography of one of the most underlooked but badass women from English history Norton uses Lady Fortune and her wheel as a metaphor for Margaret s story, a woman who by all rights should have been queen her son took half his right to inherit from her, the other from his wife She was a behind the scenes agitator for her only child, a son who eventually SPOILER alert became King Henry VII, the first Tudor king she was a spider who spun webs of intrigue and treason for her son against the ruling might of male power Most especially these webs were woven to defeat Richard III, that most infamous of kings Once her son gained the throne, she ruled almost jointly with him, and became one of his most trusted advisors Because of the times, because she was a woman, we know little about her although thousands of timesthan most women from the same time period Norton takes the dots of her life that do show up in the record her wills, the books she had published, her marriage records, the letters that survive and connects them to create a highly readable and enjoyable biography of one of the major players in the Wars of the Roses

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