Zone



Francis Servain Mirkovic, A French Born Croat Who Has Been Working For The French Intelligence Services For Fifteen Years, Is Traveling By Train From Milan To Rome He S Carrying A Briefcase Whose Contents He S Selling To A Representative From The Vatican The Briefcase Contains A Wealth Of Information About The Violent History Of The Zone The Lands Of The Mediterranean Basin, Spain, Algeria, Lebanon, Italy, That Have Become Mirkovic S SpecialtyOver The Course Of A Single Night, Mirkovic Visits The Sites Of These Tragedies In His Memory And Recalls The Damage That His Own Participation In That Violence As A Soldier Fighting For Croatia During The Balkan Wars Has Wreaked In His Own Life Mirkovic Hopes That This Night Will Be His Last In The Zone, That This Journey Will Expiate His Sins, And That He Can Disappear With Sashka, The Only Woman He Hasn T Abandoned, ForeverOne Of The Truly Original Books Of The Decade And Written As A Single, Hypnotic, Propulsive, Physically Irresistible Sentence Mathias Nard S Zone Provides An Extraordinary And Panoramic View Of The Turmoil That Has Long Deviled The Shores Of The MediterraneanZone

French fiction author He mainly writes novels with Arabic themes At university he studied Arabic and Persian In 2000 he moved to Barcelona Spain , where he writes all his works.His first novel was La Perfection du tir, released in 2003 Twobooks were released before his first success, Zone, appeared in 2008 This book, written as a single sentence that continues alongthan 500 pages, is an internal monologue of an ex veteran from the war between Israel and Palestine.His next oeuvre was an even a greater success Parle leur de batailles, de rois et d l phants, a historical novel where Enard talks about the true experience of Michelangelo Buonarroti in Constantinople Istanbul.In 2012 he published with Actes Sud Rue des voleurs In 2015 Enard will release another ambitious book titled Boussole .

[Ebook] Zone By Mathias Énard – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 517 pages
  • Zone
  • Mathias Énard
  • English
  • 02 April 2018
  • 1934824267

10 thoughts on “Zone

  1. says:

    Since the time of Troy the Mediterranean Basin, which Mathias nard simply calls Zone, has been being torn apart and racked with wars and atrocious historical cataclysms And his novel, heavy with the references and allusions to The Iliad, is a history of violence in the area told in the single, excruciatingly dark sentence I had forgotten that I was a pawn like any other in the quarrels of Zeus, Hera, Apollo and Pallas Athena, a pawn used for carrying out an aim as obscure as the clouds amasse Since the time of Troy the Mediterranean Basin, which Mathias nard simply calls Zone, has been being torn apart and racked with wars and atrocious historical cataclysms And his novel, heavy with the references and allusions to The Iliad, is a history of violence in the area told in the single, excruciatingly dark sentence I had forgotten that I was a pawn like any other in the quarrels of Zeus, Hera, Apollo and Pallas Athena, a pawn used for carrying out an aim as obscure as the clouds amassed over inaccessible Olympus, that s one way to console yourself, I could also say OK I was fooled deceived manipulated used, nothing else The protagonist, who secretly identifies himself with Achilles, is a petty spy, a soldier in the army of shadows, a Trojan Horse rider going from Milan to Rome in the train, recollecting his life, contemplating brutality of mankind and trying to flee from his murky past ogres want everything, take everything, eat everything, power, money, weapons, and females, in that order, and these stories of monsters reminded me of my own ogres, Serbian, Croatian, who could unleash all their rage and quench all their thirst for mythic humanity, violence and desire, these stories were the delights of the man in the street, the children, the meek, happy to see the powerful get humiliated in turn in front of someonepowerful, lose their honor their wives as the poor had lost their houses their children or their legs in a bombardment, which after all seemed less serious than dishonor and humiliation, the defeat of the powerful is tremendous, beautiful and loud, a hero always makes noise when he collapses, a hundred kilos of muscle strike the ground in one huge dull thud, the public is on its feet to see Hector tied to the chariot, see his head wobble and his blood spurt, the ogre conquered by an even bigger ogre When masters fall out, their men get the clout When titans collide, that is mice that get crushed And devastation is irreversible nothing returns from what has been destroyed, nothing is reborn, neither dead men, nor burned libraries, nor submerged lighthouses, nor extinct species, despite the museums commemorations statues books speeches good will, of things that have gone only a vague memory remains We sleep calmly seeing sweet dreams but somewhere it s war the innocents are dying, happiness is annihilated, homes lie in ruins There is always war somewhere near

  2. says:

    One last suitcase and I ll join Sashka with the transparent gazenolists notorturers victims investigationsI m changing my lifeSuch recalls Umberto Eco s definition of a polymath, one that is interested in everything and nothing else Enard s gripping novel punches this reader with the weight of nearly all recorded recoded history in its wake.

  3. says:

    nard is the spiral architect par excellence, conceiving and bringing forth something truly exceptional an epic maelstrom of interiority, a narrative storm of bruising power, a breathless, beautiful, benumbing barrage of Mediterranean mounted memories whose track tied onrushing spans the tide ticked sea of time from the basest, the ugliest of materials the limitless human capacity for violence, irrationality, depravity, savagery, and self deception.Conceits exist within the book s framework and nard is the spiral architect par excellence, conceiving and bringing forth something truly exceptional an epic maelstrom of interiority, a narrative storm of bruising power, a breathless, beautiful, benumbing barrage of Mediterranean mounted memories whose track tied onrushing spans the tide ticked sea of time from the basest, the ugliest of materials the limitless human capacity for violence, irrationality, depravity, savagery, and self deception.Conceits exist within the book s framework and design the text is composed as a single five hundred and seventeen page sentence, with each individual page representing a kilometer traveled over plain, across mountain and through city along the high speed train route between Milan and Rome on a chilly December evening Although limited to a single period on the final page, nard has divided his story into twenty four sections, a homage to an Iliad that serves as both inspiration and mythological orchestra for the torrent of fevered and bloodstained remembrances that take place within, and which allow him the insertion of a novella recounting the melancholy triangulation between a trio of stateless Palestinian insurgents pinned inside Beirut during the midpoint years of the vicious Lebanese Civil War briefly read en voyage by the story s narrator, and which prose actually adheres to the standardized rules of grammar This short fiction within fiction also features a heroic archetype in one these three Palestinian fighters a man dead from the first word who functions as an idealized repository of all the nobility, self sacrifice, and human feeling that the narrating consciousness finds so desperately lacking in the miasmic chain of ghost riddled events that comprise his own life s memory.And what a memory this excruciated, suppurating spirit has amassed over the course of a life lived in and around the Zone a euphemism for the various invisibly demarcated geographic areas endowed with the appellation nation that abut upon the centralizing watery mass known as the Mediterranean Sea This wracked individual, one Francis Servain Mirkovic, the sole male offspring of a union between a fiercely proud Croatian expatriate mother and an icily pragmatic French father, rode an adolescent attraction to neo fascist trappings into a trial enlistment in the French military, a brief stint followed by an enthusiastic offer to volunteer with the Croatian paramilitary forces then engaged in a desperate struggle against a well equipped Serbian army determined to prevent Croatia s independence Present and involved through a goodly portion of the savage Balkan Wars of the early nineties a service that secretly exhilarates the mother and disturbs the father Francis will experience the elation of finding brothers in arms and the deflation of outliving them, emerging at the end of it all an emotionally crippled man After a period of peregrinations about the Zone, he ends up joining the French Intelligence Service, where his experiences, fluency, and outwardly personable demeanor recommend him to the position of traveling liaison with a number of the sibling secret services located within the environs of the Zone.Yet he is tortured by his war experiences, the savagery within him they unleashed, and the toll they have enacted upon his personal life, and it drives him to seek out the gruesome, repellently fascinating details of the prolific and variegated enactments of human violence that comprise such a significant portion of the history of the Zone and by combining his own recollections and learned history with the stories and anecdotes related by his colleagues in the shadowy world of intelligence gathering, he has persistently and surreptitiously amassed a copious collection of names, photographs, dates, and evidence detailing those who were killed and those who did the killing Having reached a breaking point in his life, enslaved by alcoholism and unable to emotionally connect with the women who have entered his life, Francis has assumed the identity of an institutionalized childhood acquaintance and fled both his work and his home in Paris, his destination the Eternal City, Rome where he plans to sell his extensive chronicle of murder at large to agents of the Vatican and retire anon upon the proceeds he expects to reap from this macabre exchange.To describe all of the above is not to give anything away, for almost the entirety of this information is made available in the opening section indeed, the course of this motion based tale is one of experiencing the colliding and rebounding stream of thought that flows unimpeded through the increasingly frenzied mind of Francis the Consumed In relating the details of his life he returns time and again to the same situations, imparting through the roaring flame of his incendiary verbal barrage the flickers of new information, new names, new details, all of which combine to make clearer the picture he painted of these various portions of his life upon the previous visit It is slowly, but inexorably revealed that Francis is the offspring of fascist violence married to capitalist democratic violence, with a strain of communism running at the margins, via his mother s connection to the Croatian Ustashi and his father s disturbing occupation during the Algerian War born with a barbarous streak that ever lurks under the surface, an inherent strain of violent longings that have alienated him from two of his previous lovers and threaten to derail his current relationship with a third.Intermingled with the story of Francis life as a warrior and spy immersed within the sanguinary cycles of the Zone are his sidelong ruminations upon the actions of a slew of in famous personages who left their mark upon these environs Ezra Pound, Jean Genet, Cervantes, Jos Mill n Astray, Ante Pavelic, Gavrillo Princep, Diocletian, a trio of Nazi death camp commandants, William Burroughs, Malcolm Lowry, James Joyce, Caravaggio and this but a sample A particular focus is given to the destructive pasts and presents of the Balkans, Spain, Algeria, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, and the Middle Eastern abrasions of Israel, Lebanon, and Syria, with an appreciable nod to the currently inflamed War on Terror and the Zone continuities found in Guant namo all interconnected with the tessellates of Francis story by means of an impressive ingenuity and cohesion There are also repeated references to the Trojan War and, in particular, to the fickle and fateful meddling by the gods and goddesses of the Greek Pantheon indeed, to the war warped perspective of the train bound narrator, the capricious presence of a Zeus, a Hades, an Apollo or Athena resonatestrenchantly to the blood drenched travails of the Mediterranean ringed world than the remote and hollow God worshiped by the three great monotheistic religions who have wreaked such a pronounced slaughter upon each other over the ages.Such a book carries with it the potentiality for pretension or bathos, amongst others, but nard amazingly avoids all perils the entirety is executed to within a degree of perfection The collision of thoughts makes the text difficult to find the rhythm of out of the gate, but surprisingly quickly it settles into a pattern that flows along with an unstoppable force of compulsion The detailing of one violent, vicious act after another could hobble another book, but the matter of factness of Francis voice, the way he blends the murderous history distilled from real life with the personal experience deceit that has left him so scarred, such a hollow shell of a man, and the energized impartiality with which he connects the disparate fragments of his overwhelming obsession channel the sickening repetition of murder and rape and destruction and this is, in no uncertain terms, an unrelenting presentation of crimes overwhelmingly perpetrated by men and cruelly inflicted with a depressing regularity upon women and children into a form that illuminates the story while driving it forward in a thoroughly readable manner There is a sickness in humanity, one from which it seems incapable of attaining a cure and Francis has become a specialist in the permutations of this sickness as it played and plays out within the Zone, hoping vainly that by confronting the ghosts of our collective and individual inhumanity he can exorcise those ghosts created by his own It would seem an unlikely thing that a book convulsed with the episodic revelations of unrestrained violence there isthan a hint of the influence of Pierre Guyotat running through this affair could provide such an amazing reading experience but nard with full credit to the absolutely brilliant translation by Charlotte Mandell pulls it off in spades and in style The mystery behind Francis life as a spy and his sudden flight to Rome imbues Zone with the taste of a thriller, whilst the single sentence montage of thought barrage represents a twist upon the devices of Thomas Bernhard it is as if Rudolf from Concrete had decided to turn his contemplation from how incorporeal nature and blood relations torment solitary genius and prevent it from ever achieving anything firm to that of how mankind, in general, willingly torments and kills others in mass quantities through a grisly intermingling of a desire for vengeance, a sense of power, a pervasive fear, and an aggressive instinct that hums within the muscles and the neural network I would not be in a rush to immerse myself anew within the crimson confines of this writer s imagination but, in time, it is a trip that I will most definitely make

  4. says:

    A discontinuous sentence broken up by chapters, a few of which relate a traditionally formatted story many sentences, paragraphs, etc the narrator reads while on the train from Milan to Rome Not really a single sentence, folks, but the formal aspects of this one only superficially interest, the way each comma delineated phrase is like a train track tie, which the book associates with bodies piled up on the horizontal Like a cut up of an encyclopedia of the secret history of 20th century Euro A discontinuous sentence broken up by chapters, a few of which relate a traditionally formatted story many sentences, paragraphs, etc the narrator reads while on the train from Milan to Rome Not really a single sentence, folks, but the formal aspects of this one only superficially interest, the way each comma delineated phrase is like a train track tie, which the book associates with bodies piled up on the horizontal Like a cut up of an encyclopedia of the secret history of 20th century European Mediterranean atrocities, seamlessly streaming from the consciousness of a veteran of endless armed conflict and endless psychic wars whenever at rest if never at peace Namedrops and occasionally animates Genet, Burroughs, Joyce, Pound Receives consistent nonintrustive canonical support from the Iliad Every page lists exotic locations, not so Anglo names, wars, skirmishes, battles, conflicts, assassinations, genocides, all while alluding to classical mythology long lost antiquity, blending up a froth of world weary and wartorn sophistication, like a Sebald James Bond hybrid, like Vollmann oozing Euro essence a mix of blood and Ouzo , like Keroauc invoking Zeus instead of Buddha, like a paramilitary Proust oft alluded to, as well as Celine , all in all exactly like the narrator concocted by Monsieur Enard, born a few weeks before me As ambitious in its way as Infinite Jest and other monsters 517 pages filled with words not much white space, no dialogue etc , yet nary a mention of advertisements the stuff that makes people sad in the Zone the Mediterrean region, plus Serbia Croatia, Austria Germany, Paris, etc is purely gruesome historical hysteria thanks to compounding violent revenge violently avenged, on and on to the apocalypse Yeah Good times Maybe four stars rounded up for the sake of audacity, authority, originality, heft, scope, execution, oomph, language always pushing ahead, hard to look away yet hard to read in bed, recommended for walking readers or anyone reading on the move Really a first class foward flowing associative collage of horrific histories, but never seemingly gory for the sake of gore there s a great amputated forearm toward the end quotations to come , sometimes it s tender, a heartbreaking memory of a glimpse of white panties, the ecstatic sight of a pair of siren like dolphins A book everyone should probably read since it so generously suggests how much I at least don t know, not only the Iliad but mostly everything beyond the knowledge of the occurrence of everything that s happened over time in Germany, Poland, Serbia, Croatia, Spain, Italy, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, Algeria, on and on Not really actually recommended for most readers but, for fans of Sebald, Bolano, Vollmann, for fans of intertexual and or high art international lit, this is a can t miss atrocity exhibition

  5. says:

    The Limits of the Modernist Long SentenceThe reviews, pre publication reviews, and endorsements of this novel all focused on the notion that it is a single long sentence For example Patrick Reardon in the Chicago Tribune, December 9, 2008, which was included in the publisher s press pack But this book is not one sentence, for at least four reasons Two of them are listed in an excellent short survey of long sentences by Tim Parks New York Times, December 24, 2010, in the Book Review, p 27 The Limits of the Modernist Long SentenceThe reviews, pre publication reviews, and endorsements of this novel all focused on the notion that it is a single long sentence For example Patrick Reardon in the Chicago Tribune, December 9, 2008, which was included in the publisher s press pack But this book is not one sentence, for at least four reasons Two of them are listed in an excellent short survey of long sentences by Tim Parks New York Times, December 24, 2010, in the Book Review, p 27 1 The sentence is compromised by 23 chapter breaks.2 Three of the chapters are excerpts from an imaginary book that the narrator in Zone is reading, and those three chapters are full of periods.But there are two stronger reasons why Zone isn t a sentence 3 Enard sometimes gives up commas, so that the prose becomes agrammatical It s not a sentence if it is a string of sentence fragments.4 He mixes tenses, doesn t observe parallel constructions, doesn t avoid run on phrases, and doesn t make any attempt to structure his book according to subject, verb, and object in other words, he only takes intermittent notice of the convention called the sentence.Still, it s hard to see how any of this matters By concentrating on the supposed single sentence, the publicity engine that drove readers to this book missed otherimportant points First is the literary genealogy of the long sentence It s a typically modernist strategy, most famously used by Joyce, Faulkner, and Beckett, intended to represent experience The stream of consciousness which has been separately studied is an example Why, then, should readers in 2011 be interested in the continuation of this particular device Wouldn t it at least be interesting to ask why Enard feels that early twentieth century experiments fit his theme of twenty first century politics Then there s the problem of the disconnect between the political and historical themes of the novel and its anti grammatical construction In the New New York Times review River of Consciousness, January 9, 2011 , Stephen Burn says that the lack of formal boundaries permits an openness that counters the protagonist s obsession with the other boundaries men make and fight over, but that implies that all the boundaries the narrator recounts and the book is made of hundreds of such stories, from ancient Greek mythology to the wars in Iraq are equally well balanced by the tumbling endless prose Is each act of warfare equally well answered by the missing periods that express it Is each missing period a small indictment of the boundaries people construct There s a mismatch between the specificity of the historical material and the sameness of the lack of punctuation.Then there s the carelessness of writing without periods and other punctuation It s easy to write a version of the prose Enard writes here It s much easier, in many ways, than constructing long sentences I would trade this entire 500 page book for the sharpness of a couple of William Gass s fabulous sentences in On Being Blue There is also a disconnect between the prose and the consciousness it is meant to represent In Beckett s prose, or in Molly Bloom s monologue, there is a reason for the tumbling endless narration Here, in Burns s words, Enard leaves the reader floating free in the liquid of the narrator s mind but why is the narrator equally angry, equally disoriented, equally atemporal, in respect to each individual moment in history Even though Enard admires Joyce, Pound, Butor, and others, his mixture of allusions hasto do with Sebald but in Sebald, different places and stories have differing weight, and require differing degrees of patience and coherence Enard also admires the Pound of the Cantos, but those are deliberately fragmentary another high modernist trope while here, everything is melted as if it were the same.And does it bear saying that the writing, and the allusions, are ponderous, portentous, and humorless The weight of history has the same leaden quality here that it does in George Steiner I wonder if what caught the press s attention wasn t the very superficial combination of a gimmick a long sentence , a leaden world historical seriousness, and the commonplace rehearsal of Mediterranean political guilt and honor I notice several of the endorsements are from French television and journalism.In brief the book is full of stories, and some of the stories are full of passion, but letting your sentences slump is not a radical strategy it s a way of not working hard to make language fit its subject

  6. says:

    Mathias Enard s Zone is a novel that while it can t be said that it is breaking new ground, but it is synthesizing various threads of narrative experimentation and presenting them in a maximalist style that resembles a grand claiming of new territory W.G Sebald s Rings of Saturn, Homer s Illiad and Odyssey, David Markson s later work, Bernhard s endless paragraph and symphonic repetition, Pound and Eliot s poetry, Joyce s dreams, and even contemporary journalism on the middle east Robert Fisk Mathias Enard s Zone is a novel that while it can t be said that it is breaking new ground, but it is synthesizing various threads of narrative experimentation and presenting them in a maximalist style that resembles a grand claiming of new territory W.G Sebald s Rings of Saturn, Homer s Illiad and Odyssey, David Markson s later work, Bernhard s endless paragraph and symphonic repetition, Pound and Eliot s poetry, Joyce s dreams, and even contemporary journalism on the middle east Robert Fisk for example are evoked here This book if it resembles anything it is a meditation on the bloodstained history of the Mediterranean region, a panorama featuring its killers, victims, fascists, dreamers, artists, and writers History as a gore stained daydream of a man with a very conflicted connection to that history, a daydream experienced on a train journey, the train taking the place of one of Sebald s country walks or Bernhard s museum benches The World Wars, the Lebanese and Algerian Civil War, Cervantes and the battle of Lepanto, the fall of Yugoslavia are among the many subjects that haunt this book The brutality of much of it, the book s length, and the lack of much of the furniture of the realist novel might turn many off, but I found it compulsively readable and a book of prophetic resonance

  7. says:

    Very much worth your time Not perfect, and I share some of the concerns set out by other reviewers about its lack of focus, and the arbitrary nature of the conceit governing its prose, but there is much here that is just fantastic

  8. says:

    Zone is a remarkable book The premise of the whole thing will seem like an almost eye rolling cliche, a jaded intelligence operative is on a train from Milan to Rome to sell a handcuffed suitcase full of intelligence secrets before he leaves the spy business forever That train ride is all that happens, conventionally speaking But the torrent of memories, historical facts, and nightmarish complicities that unfold in an unstoppable bum rush from his head is as delerious and sweeping as almost Zone is a remarkable book The premise of the whole thing will seem like an almost eye rolling cliche, a jaded intelligence operative is on a train from Milan to Rome to sell a handcuffed suitcase full of intelligence secrets before he leaves the spy business forever That train ride is all that happens, conventionally speaking But the torrent of memories, historical facts, and nightmarish complicities that unfold in an unstoppable bum rush from his head is as delerious and sweeping as almost anything I ve ever read Like W.G sebald, Enard is interested in worming down into the bizarre resonances of history, by showing the cross linkages between cycles of destruction, war, and erasure Yet unlike Sebald, whose work is so grounded by specific geographic locales and his photo montages, Enard just flows ever outward, suckingandof the world through the exhausted, haunted mind of his protagonist Zone is a total book It tries to incorporate the whole history of Europe, Northern Africa, the Near Middle East, any place that in any way touches the Mediterranean basin gets pulled in The range of references to literature and to at least for a young american obscurant, often monstrous geopolitical issues in this book is overwhelming And I do mean overwhelming Almost every page had me running to try and find a map of croatia or some information about a forgotten turkish war hero, or a minor bosnian war criminal, or trying to tease apart some weird reference to the battle of troy Yet for it s deluge of erudition, the book never feels like it s just an intellectual dick measuring contest the way that a lot of sprawling high modernist stuff is Enard filters whole civilizations through a whirlwind of run on consciousness, not merely to show off intellectually, but to try and find traces of the endless volume of shadow lives and shadow histories that are what secretly support the conventional historical narratives that we all live in and reckon with Zone is a book about moving forward, both in space and in time, about being shackled to history and how that, paradoxically, can make us free

  9. says:

    An excellent book It could be a superb book, but it has 3 problems IMHO 1 it s too long I usually prefer shorter books, I rarely see the point in adding some 300 extra pages to a perfect story, but that s just my opinion 2 sometimes nard is just plain pretentious he s no doubt a man of culture and he clearly knows the Mediterranean basin as few, but he shows off all his knowledge, and I don t mean there s a problem regarding all the issues he writes about, that s actually one of his hi An excellent book It could be a superb book, but it has 3 problems IMHO 1 it s too long I usually prefer shorter books, I rarely see the point in adding some 300 extra pages to a perfect story, but that s just my opinion 2 sometimes nard is just plain pretentious he s no doubt a man of culture and he clearly knows the Mediterranean basin as few, but he shows off all his knowledge, and I don t mean there s a problem regarding all the issues he writes about, that s actually one of his highest skills, but I quite hate name dropping and he s a bit of a name dropping addict 3 the chapters written in the form of a pseudo excerpt from a fictitious book by a fictitious Lebanese writer are just fillers and they add nothing to the story, except an incongruous break in style and rhythm a problem which gets mingled with the aforementioned problems these chapters make the book longer than needed and are quite pretentious, and even a bit cheesy I could state he could also use a bitof humor in this kind of novel, but then there are authors, such as Sebald, who don t know the meaning of humor and are still good, so I won t go any farther Anyway, it s really a good book, an excellent approach to the history of violence and revenge with a fluid and compelling style And nard is a master when it gets to glue different stories in a perfect patchwork I recommend it

  10. says:

    This book is amazing Enard s prose is hypnotic, insightful, and bold in its unconventional presentation The story that he tells weaves together a vast amount of the history behind numerous wars such as those in Yugoslavia, the Gaza strip, Algeria, etc that have rolled across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for centuries all told through the voice of a man who is obsessed with these obsessive wars In fact, if I had to describe this book in a few words, I would say this it is obsessed This book is amazing Enard s prose is hypnotic, insightful, and bold in its unconventional presentation The story that he tells weaves together a vast amount of the history behind numerous wars such as those in Yugoslavia, the Gaza strip, Algeria, etc that have rolled across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for centuries all told through the voice of a man who is obsessed with these obsessive wars In fact, if I had to describe this book in a few words, I would say this it is obsessed with war and stunning in its effect.This is one of those books that comes along only infrequently in one s life, surprising you with its temerity and its skillful presentation, needling your parts of your insides that you, heretofore, did not know were so sensitive nor so thirsty for poetic expression Since starting it, I have thought about it constantly and upon reading the final sentence, I experienced a shock that is still resonating through my organism Put evensuccinctly I fucking love this book

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