The tragedie of King Richard the second



➛ [KINDLE] ❅ The tragedie of King Richard the second By William Shakespeare ➥ – E17streets4all.co.uk Written in 1595 Richard II occupies a significant place in the Shakespeare canon marking the transition from the earlier history plays dominated by civil war and stark power to a nuanced representatio Written of King Richard the Epub / in of King eBook ☆ Richard II occupies a significant place in the Shakespeare canon marking the transition from the earlier history plays dominated by civil war and stark power to a nuanced representation of the political conflicts of England's past where character and politics are inextricably intertwined It is the first of four connected plays including Henry IV Henry IV and Henry V generally considered Shakespeare's finest history plays The tragedie of King Richard the ePUB Æ drama of Richard II centers on the power struggle between The tragedie eBook ✓ the grandilouent King Richard and the plain spoken blunt Henry Bolingbroke who is banished from Britain at the beginning of the play But when Henry's father John of Gaunt dies Richard confiscates his property with no regard to his son's rights and Bolingbroke returns to confront the king who surrenders his crown and is imprisoned in Pomfret Castle where he is soon murdered This new edition in the acclaimed Oxford Shakespeare series features a freshly edited version of the text The wide tragedie of King PDF/EPUB ã ranging introduction describes the play's historical circumstances both the period that it dramatizes the start of the wars of the roses and the period in which it was written late Elizabethan England and the play's political significance in its own time and our own It also focuses on the play's richly poetic language and its success over the centuries as a play for the stage Extensive explanatory notes help readers at all levels understand and appreciate the language characters and dramatic action tragedie of King Richard the ePUB Æ and the book's lively illustrations provide a sense of the historical background and performance of the play.The tragedie of King Richard the second

William of King Richard the Epub / Shakespeare baptised of King eBook ☆ April was an English poet and playwright widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre eminent dramatist He is often called England's national poet and the Bard of Avon or simply The Bard His surviving works consist of plays sonnets two long narrative poems and several other poems His plays have been tr.

The tragedie of King Richard the second PDF/EPUB ✓
  • Paperback
  • 168 pages
  • The tragedie of King Richard the second
  • William Shakespeare
  • English
  • 12 August 2016
  • 9780198320043

10 thoughts on “The tragedie of King Richard the second

  1. says:

    Tragedy of King Richard II William ShakespeareKing Richard the Second is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in approximately 1595 It is based on the life of King Richard II of England ruled 1377–1399 and is the first part of a tetralogy referred to by some scholars as the Henriad followed by three plays concerning Richard's successors Henry IV Part 1; Henry IV Part 2; and Henry Vتاریخ نخستین خوانش بیست و یکم ژوئن سال 1989 میلادیعنوان تراژدی ریچارد دوم نمایشنامه؛ نویسنده ویلیام شکسپیر؛ مترجم احمد خزاعی؛ تهران، فرهنگخانه اسفار، 1367، در 249 ص، عکس، عنوان روی جلد ریچارد دوم؛ موضوع نمایشنامه ریچارد دوم شاه انگلستان از 1367 تا 1400 مجناب محسن جده دوستان؛ در سال 1380 هجری خورشیدی این اثر را از ترجمه آلمانی اثر به فارسی برگردانده اند، 118 ص؛ شابک 9645596424؛ تراژدی شاه «ریچارد دوم» را، تغزلیترین نمایشنامه «ویلیام شکسپیر»، یا دست کم تغزلیترین نمایشنامه ی تاریخی ایشان دانسته اند؛ لحن حاکم بر نمایشنامه، مرثیه سرایی است؛ گرچه گاه لحن حماسی نیز به خود میگیرد؛ «ریچارد دوم» به ظاهر استعاره ای سیاسی ست؛ اما در حقیقت «تاریخ ذهن انسان است»؛ در سراسر نمایشنامه، سخن از نبرد، در میان است، اما نبرد در عرصه ی روح انسان؛ و به ویژه در روح و روان ریچارد دوم، که خود نماد «سقوط دوباره انسان» است، جریان دارد؛ ؛ ا شربیانی

  2. says:

    For the first time Shakespeare creates a compelling historical protagonist who speaks naturally in a poetic voice that is distinctively his own In his earlier works involving kings and emperors Shakespeare imitated Marlowe's mighty line with some if not complete success Richard III was inherently Marlovian which helped but in Richard II he at last found a king a weak man but a considerable poet with an eye for detail whom he could animate from the inside a king comfortable with the rhetoric of royal pageantry than with the governing his country Like Hamlet Richard and his language dominate the play which he inhabits and the downside to this is that the play inevitably loses a little of its light and beauty whenever he is not on the stage

  3. says:

    Richard II Wars of the Roses #1 William Shakespeare Roma Gill EditorKing Richard the Second is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in approximately 1595 It is based on the life of King Richard II of England ruled 1377–1399 and is the first part of a tetra logy referred to by some scholars as the Henriad followed by three plays concerning Richard's successors Henry IV Part 1; Henry IV Part 2; and Henry Vتاریخ نخستین خوانش سال 1989 میلادی عنوان تراژدی ریچارد دوم نمایشنامه؛ نویسنده ویلیام شکسپیر؛ مترجم احمد خزاعی؛ تهران، فرهنگخانه اسفار، 1367، در 249ص، عکس، عنوان روی جلد ریچارد دوم؛ موضوع نمایشنامه ریچارد دوم شاه انگلستان از روز ششم ماه ژانویه سال 1367 میلادی تا روزچهاردهم ماه فوریه سال 1400میلادی سده 16مآقای محسن جده دوستان در سال 1380هجری خورشیدی، این اثر را از ترجمه آلمانی اثر، به فارسی برگردانده اند، در 118ص؛ترازدی شاه ریچارد دوم را، تغزلیترین نمایشنامه ی «ویلیام شکسپیر»، یا دست کم تغزلیترین نمایشنامه ی تاریخی ایشان دانسته اند؛ لحن حاکم بر نمایشنامه، مرثیه سرایی است؛ گرچه، گاه لحن حماسی نیز، به خود میگیرد؛ ریچارد دوم، به ظاهر استعاره ای سیاسی ست؛ اما در حقیقت «تاریخ ذهن انسان است»؛ در سراسر نمایشنامه، سخن از نبرد در میان است، اما نبرد در عرصه ی روح انسان؛ و به ویژه در روح و روان ریچارد دوم، که خود نماد «سقوط دوباره انسان» است، جریان دارد؛ ؛ ا شربیانی

  4. says:

    Reading William Shakespeare makes me feel good about what can be accomplished in language Richard II is fantastic I’d read Henry IV both parts multiple times without realizing that Richard II is considered the first play in the War of the Roses series Not only does Richard II provide a seamless transition to Henry IV it also gives some introduction to the ways in which the monarchy was viewed As such it serves as a great transition to Shakespeare’s other history plays In the play Richard II sees himself not so much as a person but a personification of England and all its glory “This blessed plot this earth this realm this England” Act 2 Scene 1 That’s what makes the drama his banishment of Bolingbroke and subseuently robbing him of his birthrightfortune so compelling In his role as king he is entitled to do whatever he wants There is no wrong or right to his decisions; his unuestioned will is also the will of the nation That logic makes it inconceivable that he would or could make a mistake When Bolingbroke returns and deposes Richard he robs him of everything which made Richard great The ueen makes it clear it is not just a title which Richard has lostWhat is my Richard both in shape and mindTransform'd and weaken'd? hath Bolingbroke deposedThine intellect?ueen Act 5 Scene 1The language resonated with me I’m including some examples belowFor heaven’s sake let us sit upon the groundAnd tell sad stories of the death of kingsKing Richard Act 3 Scene 2The shadow of your sorrow hath destroyed The shadow of your faceBolingbroke Act 4 Scene 1I wasted time and now doth time waste meKing Richard Act 5 Scene 5I'll make a voyage to the Holy Land To wash this blood off from my guilty handKing Henry Act 5 Scene 6Of course at the beginning of Henry IV Part 1 King Henry puts off this trip to the Holy Land but that’s another story Looking forward to reading the Henry IV plays again

  5. says:

    I’ve read this four times now and I’ve seen three different versions of it too yet one thing remains certain throughout this can be interpreted in so many different ways Shakespeare’s wonderful like that; he’ll write a line or a piece of verse that can be taken in so many ways ultimately changing the meaning of the play depending on how it is read or adapted Indeed Shakespeare doesn’t judge his characters Instead he portrays them how they may have perceived themselves To Richard’s mind he is the undisputed mortal representative of God’s will on earth; he simply cannot be wrong in his actions Comparatively Henry Bolingbroke is a man taking back his confiscated fortune and birth right When the crown comes into play it becomes incredibly difficult to perceive who the victim of the play is Is it the usurped King? Or is it the unjustly banished Duke? Shakespeare leaves it up to the audience to decide and fight it out You may my glories and my state deposeBut not my griefs; still am I king of thosePersonally I think both characters play a little bit of the victim and a little bit of the tyranniser They corner themselves into a situation in which every decision is a morally uestionable one; this is not something that could easily be resolved Richard could not simply welcome Bolingbroke with open arms to do so would be to admit that he was himself wrong A King could never do that nor could he go down without some semblance of a fight or display of himself being usurped Richard is a boy King; his body grew but his mind never fully developed to the realities of the world His decisions are rash unfair and at times almost random He doesn’t fully register the conseuences of his actions That’s what comes of a mind set that perceives itself as a conduit’s of God’s divine will He is God’s chosen King; therefore he cannot be disobeyed So when he banishes his cousin and steals his fortune it doesn’t matter to him There’s no injustice to it in his mind It is simply the will of the King and of God Conversely Bolingbroke faces down the King and usurps his throne He claims to have entered England for the purposes of reclaiming his fortune and nothing But somehow he ends up with his cousin’s crown on his head When Richard returns to the Irish war he finds that all his most powerful nobles are behind his enemies cause He is destitute but he is still the King of England Everybody recognises this even Bolingbroke In his wrath he delivers his most monumental speech and his most devastating He calls upon the armies of heaven to vanuish this usurper Nothing happens Thus Richard believes that God has abandoned him so he willingly gives the crown to Bolingbroke but not without his final display of victimisation Bolingbroke still claims not to want the crown though England wants him to have it So he takes the throne and becomes Henry IV For God's sake let us sit upon the groundAnd tell sad stories of the death of kings;How some have been deposed; some slain in warSome haunted by the ghosts they have deposed;Some poison'd by their wives some sleeping kill'd;All murder'd for within the hollow crownThat rounds the mortal temples of a kingKeeps Death his court and there the antic sitsScoffing his state and grinning at his pompAllowing him a breath a little sceneTo monarchize be fear'd and kill with looksInfusing him with self and vain conceitAs if this flesh which walls about our lifeWere brass impregnable and humour'd thusComes at the last and with a little pinBores through his castle wall and farewell king Now this is where the multifaceted nature of the play comes into uestion Who is the victim of the work? Is there a villain? The answer generally depends on your perception of the divine right of Kings and the production you hold in your heart I cannot form a definitive answer for my own mind so I cannot argue either way There isn’t a straightforward answer to this History aside both men make mistakes within the plays action But who is to blame? The tragic elements of the work are in Richard’s favour but his cousin is only after his birth right Through their conflict both men are backed into a corner in which only one can escape Damn I love this play I might go read it again; it is pure poetry

  6. says:

    ‘’For God’s sake let us sit upon the groundAnd tell sad stories of the death of kings;How some have been deposed; some slain in warSome haunted by the ghosts they have deposed;Some poison’d by their wives some sleeping kill’d;All murder’d for within the hollow crownThat rounds the mortal temples of a kingKeeps Death his court and there the antic sitsScoffing his state and grinning at his pompAllowing him a breath a little sceneTo monarchize be fear’d and kill with looksInfusing him with self and vain conceitAs if this flesh which walls about our lifeWere brass impregnable and humour’d thusComes at the last and with a little pinBores through his castle wall and farewell kingCover your heads and mock not flesh and bloodWith solemn reverence throw away respectTradition form and ceremonious dutyFor you have but mistook me all this whileI live with bread like you feel wantTaste grief need friends subjected thusHow can you say to me I am a king?’’ Richard II Act 3 Scene 2 Last Saturday I was watching what must be my favourite documentary BBC’s Shakespeare Uncovered This particular episode was presented by the living legend and Theatre Icon Derek Jacobi dedicated to Richard II one of the most particular and complex History plays although I’ve always classified it under the Tragedies category Written entirely in verse reflecting the Medieval ethic of the Divine Right of Kings Shakespeare gives us a bitter lament over a monarch who has lost the people’s trust and is now trapped in the hands of Bollingbroke the ‘’new’’ type of monarch who arms himself with machinations and violence to change the status uo However Shakespeare stretches the vanity and fickle nature of the monarchy as an institution on the whole With the aforementioned monologue one of the finest and truest pieces he ever produced Richard finally understands that between the two bodies of the king there can only be struggle and strifeDo yourselves a favour If you haven’t watched the great Derek Jacobi as Richard II do so The performance is available on YouTube ‘’What must the king do now? must he submit?The king shall do it must he be deposed?The king shall be contented must he loseThe name of king? o' God's name let it goI'll give my jewels for a set of beadsMy gorgeous palace for a hermitageMy gay apparel for an almsman's gownMy figured goblets for a dish of woodMy sceptre for a palmer's walking staffMy subjects for a pair of carved saintsAnd my large kingdom for a little graveA little little grave an obscure grave;Or I'll be buried in the king's highwaySome way of common trade where subjects' feetMay hourly trample on their sovereign's head;For on my heart they tread now whilst I live;And buried once why not upon my head?’’

  7. says:

    Book Review 4 out of 5 stars to Richard II a tragedy or historical account written in 1595 by William Shakespeare Richard II is the first of a series written about the War of the Roses a famous tug of war over England's throne just prior to Shakespeare's time This is the most fascinating period of English history for me and I loved reading this play Though Richard III is my favorite of all the kinds during this era the circumstance surrounding Richard II's kingdom and power are uite uniue He was either a brilliant man or the biggest loon out there He had ideas but he couldn't follow through with them due to a split in his views on responsibility His words had beauty but he wasn't respected Shakespeare paints a similar picture of him There's little plot in comparison to other plays It's of a historical account a point in time view of what was happening Who was trying to take the throne? What was each man's or woman's position? How would it turn out? People wanted to read this to see what he'd choose If you're not a history buff there's no point in reading it other than perhaps for some of the beauty in the images being created in each passage and in the dialogue You might even want to brush up on the time period by reading some historical fiction such as a few of the books by Philippa Gregory covering these characters It'll help with perspective and background then you can compare the way the characters cum real life people are portrayed About Me For those new to me or my reviews here's the scoop I read A LOT I write A LOT And now I blog A LOT First the book review goes on Goodreads and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at where you'll also find TV Film reviews the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the whowhatwhenwhere and my pictures Leave a comment and let me know what you think Vote in the poll and ratings Thanks for stopping by

  8. says:

    What is power? What does it mean to be a king? What is history about? These are essential uestions that Shakespeare tackled again and again through his “Histories” and many of his tragedies from Julius Caesar to Macbeth and from Coriolanus to Lear Richard II is no exception and presents yet another turn of the Wheel of Fortune After writing the tetralogy of Henry VI in three parts and Richard III Shakespeare wanted to explore the origins of the Wars of the Roses This then is the first part of the “Henriad” a “preuel” and a second tetralogy with Richard II Henry IV in two parts and Henry V — compare this process if you will to George Lucas producing three new episodes of Star War after his initial trilogyRichard II is a tyrannical and capricious king who takes ill advised decisions changes his mind on a whim tries to impress everyone but fails miserably makes a fool of himself shoots himself in the foot and is eventually forced to move over in this regard he reminded me at times of the current US president Shakespeare makes him a petulant character but never sheds pathos over himThere are however in this play some of the most touching expressions of patriotism and at the same time the fiercest criticism of political power See for instance John of Gaunt’s angry rant II1 “This blessed plot this earth this realm this England” etc Richard II was written around the same time as Romeo and Juliette and the title role is redolent of that of Henry VI However it is hard not to notice how some lines also herald future plays For instance compare Richard’s “I live with bread like you feel want taste greed need friends” III2 and Shylock’s famous “If you prick us do we not bleed?” However and above all this play foreshadows the tragedy of Hamlet The king himself is a meditative slightly cynical character who delivers lyrical and sometimes rambling monologues with hints of pessimistic metaphysics In particular the dazzling scene of the destitution and the shattered mirror IV1 between Richard the king and Bolingbroke the usurper prophesies the famous confrontations between Hamlet the prince and Claudius another usurper Ben Whishaw’s Michael Jackson like performance as King Richard in the recent TV adaptation The Hollow Crown BBC is superb and kept me on my toes throughout

  9. says:

    I'm on a history kick so what better way to supplement the immersion into The War Of The Roses than to dive into Shakespeare?Richard II begins the weakness of kings where if one could be deposed yet can follow Divine right be damned should we just rely on might?It's kind of funny reading this for the second time after so many years and other historical accounts just how propagandist this play really is I suppose that shouldn't be a surprise since it had only been a little over a century prior from the time it was written and Elizabeth is the product of so much Lancaster and York strife that stems right from these humble and piteous beginningsFrankly I'm really surprised at the balance of this play where Richard boy king makes monstrously poor decisions and banishes Henry Bolingbroke and later steals all his lands to fund a war in Ireland which goes disastrously Henry Bolingbroke returns from his banishment on such tidings his lands and monies gone his father dead and he sues to get redress from the wrongs done to him He has good reasonBut In deposing the king it opens the weakness of all kings and puts the uestion to every mind in England can we ever stop? If it is this easy to depose one just how easily can we do it again and again and again? And indeed this play is perfectly historical in that respect even if the man Richard was actually pretty good with finances and stopped fighting for war in France because England couldn't support it sighThe thing about Shakespeare is this DRAMA UEEN The outcome of Richard's abdication is a long drawn out drama fest Oh woe is me oh woe is me It makes for great spectacle that's for sure and we even get one of the longest solilouies in Shakespeare right from Richard's mouth Henry is only better in his sorrow that all such things came to pass in that he had less page time I hated the man in life but love in him death indeedAs a side note I loved the scenes with Henry's uncle and his wife trying to pardon their son's near treachery My god the pathos it's taken so far it could easily be comedic relief and I'm certain that some productions of this play could turn it into just thatSame goes for old Gaunt's ramblings which are tragic because he knew that Richard would disenfranchise Henry but that's the beauty of these plays They're always entertaining and perhaps a bit over the top but they're definitely not simple or simply interpreted Indeed you can find plenty in this whole play to support the True King or Justice or change your mind all over again and switch sidesOddly enough since I had just read King Henry IV part one this month which directly follows the events in Richard II I was horrified and bemused by Henry's several references to having bloody hands and washing them after Richard's death because some twenty years later as the king he suffers from boils and agues on his hands and face almost as if it is divine retribution for deposing the rightful king and he always keeps gloves on and rubs his hands incessantly Perfect setup and execution But in this case I'm doing it backwards Fun stuff and so amusing even if it is propaganda Shakespeare was always walking a tightrope

  10. says:

    Richard II takes place after a significant number of events transpire after the end of King Edward III the Black Prince has died and left Edward III with no sons alive so his grandson Richard II takes the throne The English holdings in England are consolidated but due to the Treaty of Brétigny the English claim to the French throne has been renounced For the moment The problem with Richard II is that he is not attentive enough to his country and challenged by Henry Bollingbroke and Henry's father John of Gaunt who is the best that England has to offer as a leader As the play opens Thomas Mowbray and Henry Bollingbroke are in open conflict Henry accusing the Thomas of the murder of the Duke of Gloucester and are set to have a duel But surprisingly and yet predictably due to Richard II's weak character Richard II ends the duel before it starts and banishes both of the antagonists The return of Bollingbroke will have huge conseuences towards the end of the play which is primarily on the conflict between these two and the eventual crowning of Bollingbroke as Henry IV in Act V as well as the murder of the deposed Richard II This coup d'etat will be paid for in blood in the following plays leading ultimately to Richard IIIThe play itself does a great job of showing off the indecisive personality of Richard II the wisdom of the dying John of Gaunt the bravery and rashness of Bollingbroke as the story moves inexorably forward I loved the elegy to England by the dying John of GauntJOHN OF GAUNT This royal throne of kings this sceptered isle This earth of majesty this seat of Mars This other Eden demi paradise Richard II Act 2 Scene iWhat is truly transcendent with Shakespeare is how the characters evolve In the case of Richard II who as I mentioned is relatively indecisive and interested in culture than in politics he has a melancholy realization that he will ultimately lose to Bollingbroke which is beautiful and sad and forms the core of the playRICHARD For within the hollow crownThat rounds the mortal temples of a kingKeeps Death his courtRichard II Act 3 Scene iiThis phrase the hollow crown was used by the BBC as the title for their excellent renditions of the historical plays all but Edward III and Henry VI Part 3 in 2012 and 2016 The performance of Ben Winshaw as Richard II was mesmerizing and the performance in general shed lights on so many corners of the text that I revised my rating to 4 There is so much depth here Particularly in Act 3 scene iv where Richard gives up his crown but not without giving Bolingbroke a memorable spectacle which will haunt his coming days the speeches here are fantasticThe play ends with the murder of Richard II Alack poor Richard and the dirty conscience of Henry IV which he promises to expiate via a pilgrimage to Jerusalem make a voyage to the Holy Land To wash the blood off from my guilty hand As we will see in the Henry IV Part 2 he will never make this trip but he will die in a chapel named Jerusalem

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