The Unromantic Orient



[Reading] ➸ The Unromantic Orient By Muhammad Asad – E17streets4all.co.uk In the spring of , twenty one year old Leopold Weiss received a letter from his uncle Dorian to come and live in his delightful old Arab stone house in Jerusalem on the fringe of the Old City near the In the spring of , twenty one year old Leopold Weiss received a letter from his uncle Dorian to come and live in his delightful old Arab stone house in Jerusalem on the fringe of the Old City near the Jaffa Gate On a foggy morning in the summer of , Leopold Weiss stood on the planks of a ship on his way to the East where he would experience his first Arab encounters as if they were a presentiment of what The Unromantic Epub / the future held in store for him It was as when you enter a strange house for the first time and an indefinable smell in the hallway dimly gives you a hint of things which will happen to you as if they are to be joyful things, and you feel a stab of rapture in your heart After several months of travel in the Middle East, Leopold Weiss returned to Germany and published his journal entries as Unromantisches Morgenland, aus dem Tagebuch einer Reise This first English translation of a long forgotton work recaptures his initial experiences in an unknown and intriguing land where he found a new home and a new sense of belonging The Unromantic Orient is not only an impressionistic journal of a young man in search of certitude, it also provides insights into the spiritual transformation of Leopold Weiss who would soon convert to Islam and spend the rest of his life in studying and writing about it The travelogue starts at the Jerusalem train station and takes us through Cairo, Amman, parts of the TransJordan, Palestine, Damascus, and Istanbul.The Unromantic Orient

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The Unromantic Orient Epub µ The Unromantic  Epub /
    If you re looking for a CBR and CBZ reader feel a stab of rapture in your heart After several months of travel in the Middle East, Leopold Weiss returned to Germany and published his journal entries as Unromantisches Morgenland, aus dem Tagebuch einer Reise This first English translation of a long forgotton work recaptures his initial experiences in an unknown and intriguing land where he found a new home and a new sense of belonging The Unromantic Orient is not only an impressionistic journal of a young man in search of certitude, it also provides insights into the spiritual transformation of Leopold Weiss who would soon convert to Islam and spend the rest of his life in studying and writing about it The travelogue starts at the Jerusalem train station and takes us through Cairo, Amman, parts of the TransJordan, Palestine, Damascus, and Istanbul."/>
  • 142 pages
  • The Unromantic Orient
  • Muhammad Asad
  • 15 September 2019
  • 9839154613

10 thoughts on “The Unromantic Orient

  1. says:

    Dear Leopold Weiss,Please take me another time to the place where no boundaries existed among my nation.Please take me back to my people who were still yearning for unity and independence.Let me feel another time the splendour of Jerusalem, Damascus, Beirut, Cairo and Istanbul Let me feel the beauty of the old city of Jerusalem, the marvelous houses of Damascus, the nice nature of Lebanon, the bustle and laughing essence of the people of Cairo, and the ringing sound of Azan from the minerates o Dear Leopold Weiss,Please take me another time to the place where no boundaries existed among my nation.Please take me back to my people who were still yearning for unity and independence.Let me feel another time the splendour of Jerusalem, Damascus, Beirut, Cairo and Istanbul Let me feel the beauty of the old city of Jerusalem, the marvelous houses of Damascus, the nice nature of Lebanon, the bustle and laughing essence of the people of Cairo, and the ringing sound of Azan from the minerates of Istanbul.As I flip and read through the entries you jot down at age of twenty two in 1922, I could conceive how you got attached to the Arab people until you called on them in Istanbul Oh my Arab people Oh Weiss, I could espy how, eventhough you were a young Austrian Jew back then, you took the stance of the Arab against Zionism, defending the Arab people s right of living in their forefathers land, Palestine.Oh Weiss, how can the reader of your Unromantic Orient not foresee that the road or the path you took in 1922 would lead you to accepting a new culture and a new people as yours and get to be known as Muhammad Asad once you accepted Islam in few years to come leaving an indispensable mark in the world until today

  2. says:

    From page 70Muslim view their women in the same way they regard children, trying to protect what is important in order not to lose it But it seems that that which is cherished is thereby devalued and gradually becomes a comfortable obsession this is likely the most distressing part of islam.Asad had later on in his life translated the Quran.

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