Those Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids



Award Winning Journalist Vivian Ho Exposes A Shattering True Crime Story, Shedding Light On America S New Lost Generation In , The Senseless Bay Area Murders Of Twenty Three Year Old Audrey Carey And Sixty Seven Year Old Steve Carter Were Personal Tragedies For The Victims Families But They Also Shed Light On A Complex Issue The Killers Were Three Drifters Scrounging For A Living Among A Burgeoning Counterculture Population Soon This Community Of Runaways And Transients Became Vulnerable Scapegoats Of A Modern Witch Hunt The Supposedly Progressive Residents Of San Francisco S Haight Ashbury, Only Two Generations Removed From The Summer Of Love, Now Feared All Of Society S Outcasts As ThreatsIn Those Who Wander, Vivian Ho Delves Deep Into A Rising Subculture That S Changing The Very Fabric Of Her City And All Of Urban America Moving Beyond The Disheartening Statistics, She Gives Voices To These Young People Victims Of Abuse, Failed Foster Care, Mental Illness, And Drug Addiction She Also Doesn T Ignore The Threat They Pose To Themselves And To Others As A Dangerous Dark Side Emerges With Alarming Urgency, She Asks What Can Be Done To Save The Next Generation Of America S Vagabond YouthThose Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Those Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids book, this is one of the most wanted Vivian Ho author readers around the world.

Reading ➶ Those Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids Author Vivian Ho – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 208 pages
  • Those Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids
  • Vivian Ho
  • 23 August 2019

10 thoughts on “Those Who Wander: America’s Lost Street Kids

  1. says:

    As the author admits, there s much information in this book that can never be verified So let s start with what can be In October, 2015, three young people murdered and robbed 23 year old Audrey Carey In San Francisco Then they moved north into Marin County They were headed to Oregon, but first they needed to steal a car For a victim, they chose 67 year old Steve Carter, who was returning to his car after walking his dog They shot and killed Carter and wounded his dog, then started north As the author admits, there s much information in this book that can never be verified So let s start with what can be In October, 2015, three young people murdered and robbed 23 year old Audrey Carey In San Francisco Then they moved north into Marin County They were headed to Oregon, but first they needed to steal a car For a victim, they chose 67 year old Steve Carter, who was returning to his car after walking his dog They shot and killed Carter and wounded his dog, then started north in his car.Haze Lampley was 26, his girlfriend Lila Alligood was 18, and their recently acquired friend was 25 year old Sean Angold Lampley s family owned land in rural Oregon and he intended to settle down and grow pot, but they never got there They stopped at a Catholic Church in Portland which runs a dining hall and showers for the homeless, the GPS on Steve Carter s car alerted police, and they were arrested and charged with murder.As is the norm, each one claimed innocence and blamed the killings on the others Angold turned state s evidence and received a reduced sentence for doing so Lampley was sentenced to 100 years in prison and Alligood to 50 A new California law now allows for earlier parole hearings Lampley could be released in his fifties Alligood as early as 43.The author was a young, naive reporter at the time of the murders A product of a loving, stable home and a recent transplant from New England, she was intrigued by the street people culture of San Francisco and the conflicting emotions it arouses in those who live there Some feel the presence of eccentrics and free spirits adds to the color and excitement of the city Some pity those who deal daily with the danger and hardships of living on the street Some see the homeless as lazy and dangerous, making the city a place they no longer want to live And the majority swing from one feeling to the other, just as most of us do.Caught up in the story of the murders, the young woman threw herself into researching the lives of Haze Lampley and Lila Alligood, trying to figure out what made them what they are For some reason, she tells nothing about Sean Angold He is despised by his friends and their families for being a snitch Does the author share that feeling or was there some other reason she didn t focuson Angold We never learn.I was surprised that she uses the term street kids for all homeless people, regardless of age She cites a study that shows 7,500 homeless people in San Francisco, with 1 3 under the age of 30 and 1 2 under the age of 40 That means that half of them are 40 or older, but in this book they re ALL dirty kids who live on the street The managers of shelters and help centers she interviews vigorously deny that any of these people are homeless by choice According to them, all homeless have fled abusive families and turned to drugs to deal with the pain of their childhoods Ms Ho accepts this mantra completely.Lampley s story early childhood with a drug addicted mother, then a stint with an abusive father seems to bear this out But further investigation shows that his tales are as full of holes as Swiss cheese On the other hand, Alligood was undeniably a child of privilege, attending a prestigious private school in Hawaii, from which she was expelled for selling drugs When her mother tried to relocate the family to help her daughter, Lila ran away She and others the author interviewed WERE on the street by choice.I was irritated by the constant use of kids which implies no responsibility but I have to admit that all of the people she interviewed young and old have one thing in common they share the teenager mentality that all parents and teachers recognize They feel invincible and pride themselves on taking risks They resent rules and authority They have unrealistic ideas about what they re entitled to and what s likely to be in their futures They re reluctant to accept any responsibility for their actions and resentful when things go wrong for them They re incapable of seeing very far ahead or of anticipating cause and effect They trust only their peers everyone else is the enemy And they have no scruples about lying to or stealing from that enemy Most of us learn early that these attitudes don t lead to success and happiness In other words, we grow up The nation of restless wanderers this author describes never do Some are caught in a cycle of bad decisions Others simply opt out of normal life.The author agonizes over the hardships of homelessness and searches for an answer She quickly finds that there isn t one because homeless people are nohomogeneous than any other group Some are rootless by choice Some are mentally ill Some have been abused as children Some are simply misfits or people who were born in the wrong century.So what s the answer More treatment for mental health and or addiction is needed, but most of us have seen loving families who ve sacrificed to send a mentally ill or addicted loved one for expensive treatment with no improvement Affordable housing is a huge need in this country, but a mentally ill or addicted or emotionally unstable person can seldom take advantage of even the most generous public benefit programs Ask the people who run programs for the homeless all over the country and they ll tell you of successes and failures.The author is a young to me woman from a privileged background whose guilt over the unfairness of life colors her thinking I look at life from the viewpoint of seven decades of observation and experience I live in a town with unusually extensive programs for homeless people, including transitional housing I vacation in a coastal town with almost no help programs, but hundreds of homeless attracted by the warm weather and the beach life I can say this for sure There are NO easy answers to this problem We have to try, but we should have reasonable expectations and we should avoid assigning wholesale blame to the families of the homeless.This book is well written and very readable The young author opens up about her own struggles to deal with the murders and the people who committed them She shares her frustration at the impossibility of learning the truth from people who are programmed to lie and cover up and blame others for their problems She beautifully expresses the anger and sorrow and guilt that we ALL feel when we see someone who lacks the basics of life She s written a book that makes the reader think For that reason, it s a valuable effort

  2. says:

    Although the book relates the stories of Lila Scott Alligood, Morrison Haze Lampley, and Sean Michael Angold, author Vivian Ho uses their experiences as a jumping off point to offer a look at a serious problem homelessness, and primarily for those who are not yet considered adults Alligood, Lampley, and Angold are all serving time for the murders of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter Ms Ho doesn t excuse their crimes Rather, she delves into the myriad causes, how all the smaller instances can le Although the book relates the stories of Lila Scott Alligood, Morrison Haze Lampley, and Sean Michael Angold, author Vivian Ho uses their experiences as a jumping off point to offer a look at a serious problem homelessness, and primarily for those who are not yet considered adults Alligood, Lampley, and Angold are all serving time for the murders of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter Ms Ho doesn t excuse their crimes Rather, she delves into the myriad causes, how all the smaller instances can lead up to actions most people find difficult to comprehend During the journey, the author ventures into a different world, that of the homeless children sometimes referred to as dirty kids She presents the material as facts, never writing to pull at the reader s heartstrings instead, the author presents her findings and allows us to determine our own final thoughts.Ms Ho s writing is descriptive and to the point At times the book reads like a novel, as the author offers a range of details to help us understand For instance, we learn about Haze Lampley s childhood from both his mother and mother in law Lampley lived with his father from age 7 to 12 The stories conflict, both blaming the other for Lampley s behavior and at times it is difficult for the parties to agree even on the simplest of events To her credit, Ms Ho presents each side and ultimately allows the reader to filter through the stories and come up with their own conclusions.The author was not content to fill up her book with background details from newspapers, magazines, and other books To her credit, she got her hands dirty by meeting face to face with homeless youths and those who work with them, conducting these visits in the subjects own environments This allowed a realistic picture to be drawn from Ms Ho s own experiences, injecting the book with a subtle power that resonates throughout the chapters She allows herself to be a conduit for the people who have experienced homelessness, both those who have found their way to a safer place and for those who still call the streets their home An enlightening, sobering read Recommended Five stars

  3. says:

    Just ok Expected For 200 pages there wasn t enough meat to this book What I found most annoying was that it was so repetitive Ho mentions the same facts and details over and over again as if the reader is incapable of remembering them from one chapter to the next.

  4. says:

    A well done book on a very important subject If this human tragedy touches you and you are able to help, check out covenanthouse.org in the US, Canada or Latin America, to help save the ones we can

  5. says:

    Part true crime, part exploration of homelessness Vivian Ho documents the murders of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter at the hands of three street kids in San Francisco Remove references and the extra sections of this book and the bulk of the content clocks in at under 200 pages It should have been shorter The unnecessary repetition of events and phrases brought me back to my school days of adding extra fluff for the purpose of hitting a specified page limit.There wasn t enough depth to the r Part true crime, part exploration of homelessness Vivian Ho documents the murders of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter at the hands of three street kids in San Francisco Remove references and the extra sections of this book and the bulk of the content clocks in at under 200 pages It should have been shorter The unnecessary repetition of events and phrases brought me back to my school days of adding extra fluff for the purpose of hitting a specified page limit.There wasn t enough depth to the reporting on either the murders or homelessness, but the latter lackedoverall and most affected my rating I would have enjoyed reading aboutmeaningful conversations between the author and her contacts for a deeper insight into their lives and what makes them click That said, as someone ignorant towards the extent of this issue in the Bay Area, the book served as a solid introductory course I also found the discussions with the main culprit, Morrison Haze Lampley, to be interesting Overall it s a thought provoking piece, but unable to offer solutions as stated in the beginning or achieve the author s primary intent finding remorse from the killer

  6. says:

    I read this in an afternoon Absolutely incredible The writing and reporting are excellent, and the stories are haunting Highly recommended to foster parents, social workers, teachers, or anyone who wants children to have true childhoods.

  7. says:

    This book will make you sad for the senseless violence, the senseless lack of social services for the homeless, and the system in place to keep the cycle going There are no answers and the author doesn t pretend to know them, but she gives a real, gritty insight into the dirty kids who live in their own world, slightly adjacent to you and I Sobering stories and shows these are people and not just statistics.

  8. says:

    Not about what it saysThis book is almost solely focused on a murder It then makes attempts to connect the fact that the murderers where street kids to make a statement about street kids for about three chapters I was anticipating investigative journalism and possible social commentary and got a true crime book Not happy

  9. says:

    It s a tragic story three troubled homeless kids find each other and then, fueled by drugs, commit two murders together I thought this was both overwritten, especially in the first half, and underinvestigated The author is a journalist, and this reads like a collection of articles about the case that needed to be connected to make a book I wish that had been done by lookingdeeply into the lives of the kids, or into the many social issues involved, than by editorializing.

  10. says:

    Lessons from this book Don t do drugs People are not basically good Trusting others is difficult for homeless kids Some murderers will NEVER express remorse almost ALL express victimhood Once someone becomes homeless, it becomes increasingly difficult to break out of it Broken, abusive, and drug using homes increase the likelihood of kids becoming homeless Weekly religious observance was not part of the family life of ANY homeless kid in this book Lessons from this book Don t do drugs People are not basically good Trusting others is difficult for homeless kids Some murderers will NEVER express remorse almost ALL express victimhood Once someone becomes homeless, it becomes increasingly difficult to break out of it Broken, abusive, and drug using homes increase the likelihood of kids becoming homeless Weekly religious observance was not part of the family life of ANY homeless kid in this book

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