On the Soul and on Memory and Recollection



Presents A View Of The Psyche That Avoids The Simplifications Both Of The Materialists And Those Who Believe In The Soul As Something Quite Distinct From Body This Title Includes Aristotle S Idiosyncratic And Influential Account Of Light And ColorsOn the Soul and on Memory and Recollection

Greece Arabic Bulgarian Russian Ukrainian Alternate European spelling Aristoteles Italian Aristotele Aristotle 384 322 B.C numbers among the greatest philosophers of all time Judged solely in terms of his philosophical influence, only Plato is his peer Aristotle s works shaped centuries of philosophy from Late Antiquity through the Renaissance, and even today continue to be studied with keen, non antiquarian interest A prodigious researcher and writer, Aristotle left a great body of work, perhaps numbering as many as two hundred treatises, from which approximately thirty one survive His extant writings span a wide range of disciplines, from logic, metaphysics and philosophy of mind, through ethics, political theory, aesthetics and rhetoric, and into such primarily non philosophical fields as empirical biology, where he excelled at detailed plant and animal observation and taxonomy In all these areas, Aristotle s theories have provided illumination, met with resistance, sparked debate, and generally stimulated the sustained interest of an abiding readership.Because of its wide range and its remoteness in time, Aristotle s philosophy defies easy encapsulation The long history of interpretation and appropriation of Aristotelian texts and themes spanning over two millennia and comprising philosophers working within a variety of religious and secular traditions has rendered even basic points of interpretation controversial The set of entries on Aristotle in this site addresses this situation by proceeding in three tiers First, the present, general entry offers a brief account of Aristotle s life and characterizes his central philosophical commitments, highlighting his most distinctive methods and most influential achievements Second are General Topics which offer detailed introductions to the main areas of Aristotle s philosophical activity Finally, there follow Special Topics which investigate in greater detailnarrowly focused issues, especially those of central concern in recent Aristotelian scholarship

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  • Paperback
  • 211 pages
  • On the Soul and on Memory and Recollection
  • Aristotle
  • English
  • 02 March 2019
  • 1888009179

10 thoughts on “On the Soul and on Memory and Recollection

  1. says:

    This book has the distinction of being one of thethought provoking works of Aristotle for me it isn t that I necessarily agree with Aristotle in all of the points he makes, but his train of thought was quite engaging That is the main reason why I give this book I higher review.The Greek word is an interesting term when it is seen in the light of the history of philosophy and theology Historically, in philosophy and theology, the word carriedor less the meaning soul and or lif This book has the distinction of being one of thethought provoking works of Aristotle for me it isn t that I necessarily agree with Aristotle in all of the points he makes, but his train of thought was quite engaging That is the main reason why I give this book I higher review.The Greek word is an interesting term when it is seen in the light of the history of philosophy and theology Historically, in philosophy and theology, the word carriedor less the meaning soul and or life, and, by implication, mind And it often was tied to metaphysical speculation Our current use of the word psyche, which is just the transliteration of the Greek word, differs somewhat from the ancient Greek use of the word After a hundred plus years of psychiatric thought, the word psyche simply refers to the physical electrochemical makeup of the mind and means little else although, one has to take into account Jung, who did hold to ametaphysical understanding of the word psyche e.g archetypes, collective unconscious, etc Aristotle was certainly going in the direction of aphysical understanding of the term psyche soul He saw the soul as being intimately associated with bodily existence and experience He seemingly sees the word as almost a cognate of the Greek term bios, although he spends much time differentiating the senses of soul as it relates to human and animal life Early on in this work, he refutes the notion of the soul having parts or of it being in any way a composite This is interesting because Aristotle, also, contradictorily, sees mind, or nous, as being within the soul It seems implied that he saw nous and psyche as being distinct, yet he doesn t see this as being indicative of partitioning or of composition He doesn t discuss how this is to be reconciled He also doesn t discuss how will Greek thelema relates to soul psyche, although he does discuss bodily motion It seems clear to me that both nous and thelema are highly relevant when it comes to any discussion of the soul, but Aristotle doesn t discuss these adequately he does, unfortunately, discuss issues regarding perception and sensuality that are not, seemingly, altogether relevant as far as I can tell but it does indicate that Aristotle saw the soul as being less metaphysical andphysical This does show a differing interpretation of soul psyche when compared to Plato and the New Testament, where the soul is unquestionablyof a metaphysical concept see e.g the Phaedrus and Matthew 16 26, respectively.As one of the earlier Greek philosophical works dedicated to investigating the concept of psyche soul, this treatise is certainly essential reading and I recommend it.The short treatise here that discusses memory and recollection is also interesting in showcasing the nuanced thinking of Aristotle Memory mnemon and recollection anamnesis are plainly distinguished in this work Memory is simply the impression that is made on the mind by any stimulus, whereas, recollection, as the name implies, requires a series of interrelated concepts Although short, I thought the work and discussion intriguing.I definitely recommend this as a good introduction to Aristotle It isn t quite as dry and pedantic as some of his other works It is also relatively short, so it can be read fairly quickly

  2. says:

    Modern readers find Aristotle s prime mover a strangely clinical notion of divinity Aristotle s sterile prose does not help matters, but the idea becomesnatural when coupled with his conception of the soul There is little distance between the soul and the ego for most modern people, but for Aristotle as for the ancient Greeks in general the soul is the animating priniciple of life hence De Anima Plants have souls Animals have souls Humans, of course, have souls And the univers Modern readers find Aristotle s prime mover a strangely clinical notion of divinity Aristotle s sterile prose does not help matters, but the idea becomesnatural when coupled with his conception of the soul There is little distance between the soul and the ego for most modern people, but for Aristotle as for the ancient Greeks in general the soul is the animating priniciple of life hence De Anima Plants have souls Animals have souls Humans, of course, have souls And the universe itself has a soul Reading this treatise in the context of his Physics and Metaphysics is an enlightening experience because one gradually comes to see that desire in all its manifold forms, from simple appetite to beatific love, really is what makes the world go round For Aristotle, anyway.Joe Sachs translation errs on the side of literalism, and this is a great thing because it gives him cause to explain and justify his choices to the reader As with his other translations, being at work staying itself is a hairy beast of a translation, but in context it gets closer to the original than actuality for entelecheia It s certainly better than Hippocrates Apostle s old translation, and it s a fine companion if you re looking at the Greek Sachs introduction is excellent, and as an appendix he has included Aristotle s short examination of Memory, which builds on some of the principles discussed in On the Soul It is a very difficult book, btw Plan on spending as much time with On the Soul as you would with a long novel, reading itthan once, taking notes and puzzling over it It s well worth the effort

  3. says:

    I read this as part of an online course on Aristotle It was challenging, and I often felt I was lost and didn t really understand what Aristotle intended, but I got a lot out of it and was pleased to have the opportunity to read and discuss this with a group of very, very smart folks.

  4. says:

    SJCA Mathematics and Natural SciencePerhaps one of the best and most challenging of Aristotle s works, De Anima is a combination of his amazing perception and observation and the kind of abstract reasoning that shines in all of his scientific inquiries De Anime is a search for the nature of living things Sachs translation is a true blessing for those of us seeking a readable natural language version, but beware if you don t like compound words and ideas, his construction of entelechei SJCA Mathematics and Natural SciencePerhaps one of the best and most challenging of Aristotle s works, De Anima is a combination of his amazing perception and observation and the kind of abstract reasoning that shines in all of his scientific inquiries De Anime is a search for the nature of living things Sachs translation is a true blessing for those of us seeking a readable natural language version, but beware if you don t like compound words and ideas, his construction of entelecheia as an at work being itself may frustrate you

  5. says:

    Opening this volume, the Greek text, and J.A Smith s translation in that official looking Barnes ed Princeton edition of Aristotle that s on everyone s bookshelf to the same passages, as I did recently with Chs 4 and 5 of Book III is an eye opening experience I was shocked by the extent to which the Smith looks, next to the Sachs, like a loose paraphrase, even to my very limited Greek It doesn t take much linguistic acumen to tell when your translator is leaving words out

  6. says:

    Read 1.1 and all of 2 and 3 our seminar didof book 2 than other classes.I want to read On Memory and Recollection at some point.

  7. says:

    Cool cover though.

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