Daughter Of The Wind



[PDF / Epub] ✅ Daughter Of The Wind Author Suzanne Fisher Staples – E17streets4all.co.uk Shabanu lives with her family in Pakistan, in a society that denies women any independence At years old, she is already betrothed Then tragedy strikes and Shabanu must choose between her own dreams o Shabanu lives with her family in Pakistan, in a society that denies women any independence Atyears old, she is already betrothed Then tragedy strikes and Shabanu must choose Daughter Of PDF/EPUB or between her own dreams of freedom and her family and culture.Daughter Of The Wind

Suzanne Fisher Staples is the author of six books addressed to children and adolescents Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA , she grew up in a small community around Daughter Of PDF/EPUB or Northwestern Pennsylvania She had three siblings, a sister and two brothers Suzanne went to Lakeland High School in Scott Township, Pennsylvania Later, she graduated from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania She got a job for years being a news reporter and editor for the United Press International She worked in many places across the USA and Asia, including Pakistan, India, Afghanistan, New York, and Washington DC In , she returned to Pakistan to assess the conditions of poor, rural women and report back to the United States Agency for International Development.

Daughter Of The Wind PDF ¼ Daughter Of  PDF/EPUB or
  • Paperback
  • Daughter Of The Wind
  • Suzanne Fisher Staples
  • English
  • 09 February 2019
  • 0744590116

10 thoughts on “Daughter Of The Wind

  1. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Shabanu Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Female Servitude.Imagine that you are a woman, and you are living in a large house with several female roommates You all have your own room, and you share the common areas amicably All is well But then, suddenly, you have another roommate The Male Gaze Male Gaze moves into your house He doesn t have a room of his own, so he takes over the common areas, and slowly the rest of the house M.G eats all your food, drinks milk from the carton, Shabanu Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Female Servitude.Imagine that you are a woman, and you are living in a large house with several female roommates You all have your own room, and you share the common areas amicably All is well But then, suddenly, you have another roommate The Male Gaze Male Gaze moves into your house He doesn t have a room of his own, so he takes over the common areas, and slowly the rest of the house M.G eats all your food, drinks milk from the carton, leaves his laundry everywhere, and never pays his rent on time Moreover, he has a strange way of making you all feel physically and mentally inferior, unwanted save for that one biblical purpose, and all in all less of a woman Obviously, M.G is a shitty roommate and a shitty person But here s the really shitty part you do nothing about it The Male Gaze is not questioned or disrupted, or kicked out of your house Perhaps you stop him once or twice to say, Hey, please don t scour my Teflon pans with steel wool, or, Hey, could you please stop beating me with sticks because I m a woman but no big change ever takes place In fact, you learn how to swallow your hopes, dreams, and yearnings, and just sort of wallow in a contemptible life with ol M.G My friends, that insufferable allegory is my summary of this book Shabanu, a nomadic Daughter of the Wind who loves her camels and her family in that orderthan her life, learns that she is nothingthan a pawn in the Marriage Game And she does nothing about it, except learn to live with it I really wanted to like Shabanu as a character, especially as a strong female character in a hyper traditional Pakistani setting However, as the narrative builds, Shabanu is left in the dust She mocks her sister Phulan for being a vapid wannabe baby maker, but I don t see muchfrom her Initially horrified by her arranged marriage to Murad, she conveniently falls head over heels in love with him right before tragedy rearranges all the arranged marriages in the family, and Phulan is reassigned from her dead fiance Hamir to Murad Shabanu is devastated, not only from losing the Love of Her Life i.e., the last two days , but also because she is now to become the fourth wife of Rahim, a man at least 40 years older than her And everyone is totally cool with it.Now, I know what you re thinking Arranged marriage is a part of Pakistani culture, and Shabanu s circumstances should come as no surprise But this is a dying custom, and one that the author purportedly makes attempts to overcome Shabanu is up in arms against it, certainly And there s her crazy aunt Sharma, who is offered to readers as a modern Pakistani thinker she is widowed and a landowner, and hates the whole arranged marriage thing Sharma gets into several shouting matches with Shabanu s family over the arrangement, accusing them of selling their daughter for camels and land which is LITERALLY WHAT THEY DID She is even kind enough to offer Shabanu a home if Rahim or his wives mistreat her But here s the bitch of it Sharma buries her feminist leanings and human kindness by THEN encouraging Shabanu to swallow her misgivings and try to make the loveless marriage work Which is exactly what Shabanu does Spoilers Whatever Also, I haven t told you how this all happens, exactly This is the part that I just cannot swallow, especially for this book s Lexile level and intended readership Perhaps Staples meant for this book to be a statement, with Shabanu s hardships demonstrating the suffocating realities of Pakistani women But, I think the total lack of an alternative is unrealistic, even with the cultural significance of arranged marriage The book offers survivors opponents to arranged marriage, such as Sharma, but then transforms them into complacent pawns in the current system Teaching young readers that inaction, subjugation, and real human suffering are the only options, especially for women, is inexcusable

  2. says:

    Read this one when i was 14 and it really made a big impression on me I loved learning about the other culture and still thought it was highly relatable I still remember it well to this day Didn t know it was a series Will check those out

  3. says:

    An amazing look at the life of a Pakistani girl who has grown up in the desert When she reaches marriageable age, content with the knowledge that she will marry one of her cousins, family tragedy and upheaval leads to her being used as a bargaining chip to settle a feud The author lived among the camel herding people of Pakistan for several years, and bases her characters on real people she knows.

  4. says:

    kinda feel like this was not appropriate for the intended age range, and also. you should maybe not write a novel whose primary purpose is social critique of a society you don t belong to just my opinion

  5. says:

    Since I started reading again, I always try to read as diverse as I can to expand my reading And it is indeed very interesting to read about the life of an 11 year old Pakistani girl who s got a lot on her plate at a very young age.Shabanu is the daughter of a camel farmer Her family grows and takes care of camels as a means of living She has an older sister 13 years old who is to be married very soon In a year, Shabanu is also to be married As the story goes on, the original plans for Sh Since I started reading again, I always try to read as diverse as I can to expand my reading And it is indeed very interesting to read about the life of an 11 year old Pakistani girl who s got a lot on her plate at a very young age.Shabanu is the daughter of a camel farmer Her family grows and takes care of camels as a means of living She has an older sister 13 years old who is to be married very soon In a year, Shabanu is also to be married As the story goes on, the original plans for Shabanu and her sister change as things go wrong and Shabanu soon finds herself needing to make a choice to obey her parents decision for her even if that decision doesn t make her happy or to disobey and claim her freedom I don t know much about Pakistani culture and it s very refreshing to read about There are a lot of things in their culture I am so confused by or found myself disagreeing with marrying at the age of 13 and I don t think I ll ever get used to that idea There were a lot of times I felt so frustrated while reading this I feel for Shabanu She was forced to grow up and make very hard decisions very early in her life She s a girl one can describe as a wild child beingboyish than she needs to be and is closer to the animals her family takes care of than to people A lot of times, I feel her emotions when she feels betrayed or when she feels like there s no one looking out for her I d say this was a pretty interesting read as I haven t read anything like it before My only complaint is that at times, I feel it s too fast paced It lacks on world building One event is dropped after another too quickly without giving its readers enough time to analyze what s been given to them My favorite thing about it probably is Shabanu s aunt Sharma and Fatima and Shabanu s relationship with the camels and her puppy I find something genuine in human animal relationships I can t find in anything else

  6. says:

    I will admit that I had a really hard time getting into it The pace was extremely slow until about page 150, when the action started I also wonder if American teenagers would really be able to relate in any way to this book Though some might be able to make the connection of Shabanu s desire for freedom to their own lives, so many of the details seemed a little difficult to relate to After all, we re talking about a culture where girls get married as soon as they get their first period and a I will admit that I had a really hard time getting into it The pace was extremely slow until about page 150, when the action started I also wonder if American teenagers would really be able to relate in any way to this book Though some might be able to make the connection of Shabanu s desire for freedom to their own lives, so many of the details seemed a little difficult to relate to After all, we re talking about a culture where girls get married as soon as they get their first period and are expected to bear children as teenagers It s a culture where fathers beat their daughters and it s considered normal, and children have no say in their own lives It certainly is eye opening to read about this sort of culture I m just not sure if teenagers would really appreciate it As far as whether it is authentic or realistic I personally don t know this culture very well, so that s a very hard thing for me to judge.I suppose the thing that bothers me a little is that I m not sure how we are supposed to interpret the culture based on this book Are we supposed to like and appreciate it Or are we supposed to dislike the culture because of how it robs Shabanu of her freedom and most of her happiness There were certain, maybe I d say stereotypes, that were unsettling to read Many people do have the idea that Muslims are very strict, the women are obedient, and the men cruel While we saw some great men in this story, I m not so sure about some of the other implications for other characters Phulan is portrayed as a girl that is stupid and empty headed, but she is also the obedient one that does what her culture wants of her Auntie is portrayed as a mean character, and she is also the one who is described as fat and people are cruel to her because of it I worry that this book almost puts this culture in a bad light I m not sure I just know that it really had me thinking about this way of life

  7. says:

    This is one of those books that I thought was SOOOOO GOOOOOD.when I was 12 I m afraid to read it again, as my taste has probably changed since then I like keeping in my childhood capsule of memory untarnished and still favored You know what I m talking about I watched Flight of the Navigator the a few years back It was SOOOOO GOOOOD, too Uh, no Lame, annoying and I ll never watch it again I should have left well enough alone.Though, if memory serves, I think it gives a fairly accurat This is one of those books that I thought was SOOOOO GOOOOOD.when I was 12 I m afraid to read it again, as my taste has probably changed since then I like keeping in my childhood capsule of memory untarnished and still favored You know what I m talking about I watched Flight of the Navigator the a few years back It was SOOOOO GOOOOD, too Uh, no Lame, annoying and I ll never watch it again I should have left well enough alone.Though, if memory serves, I think it gives a fairly accurate account of Pakistanian life And, I remember making my mom read it who does not read and she loved it, so I won t write if off completely Maybe when I m in my rocking chair I ll reread it

  8. says:

    Shabanu and the sequels are important books for the world we live in because they describe a proud, independent people who are now in the midst of what will be a long, horrible war The image of Pakistanis as either terrorists or helpless refuges are popular with news and entertainment just watch Ironmanfor all that I love movies with explosions I was horrified and saddened by that movie Shabanu is the youngest daughter of desert people her description of her family She loves the desert Shabanu and the sequels are important books for the world we live in because they describe a proud, independent people who are now in the midst of what will be a long, horrible war The image of Pakistanis as either terrorists or helpless refuges are popular with news and entertainment just watch Ironmanfor all that I love movies with explosions I was horrified and saddened by that movie Shabanu is the youngest daughter of desert people her description of her family She loves the desert, loves her camels and through her eyes I grew to love them too She describes a world with little water, little comfort and yet rich with life And a life foreign to my own I read this to my kids years ago and my daughter, then about 10, was horrified to hear the matter of fact way in which the 12 year old Shabanu talked about her marriage, which would take place in a year The books are well written which I think means that I believe them, even though they are fiction I worry when writing is good and I believe the story, especially when the subject is real In this case, the author was a reporter who covered India, Pakistan and Afghanistan for a number of years

  9. says:

    Phulan, your beauty is great But beauty holds only part of a man, and that for just so long Keep some of yourself hidden You can lavish love and praise on him and work hard by his sideBut the secret is keeping your innermost beauty, the secrets of your soul, locked in your heart so that he must always reach out to you for it Sharma, Shabanu Daughter of the Wind, P 217 You can add Suzanne Fisher Staples to the list of authors I ve discovered whose writing I absolutely love Her style Phulan, your beauty is great But beauty holds only part of a man, and that for just so long Keep some of yourself hidden You can lavish love and praise on him and work hard by his sideBut the secret is keeping your innermost beauty, the secrets of your soul, locked in your heart so that he must always reach out to you for it Sharma, Shabanu Daughter of the Wind, P 217 You can add Suzanne Fisher Staples to the list of authors I ve discovered whose writing I absolutely love Her style is sprawling and spacious, relaxed when that is the tone called for but able to turn on a dime and become very intense, too, within a surprisingly short space There were times in Shabanu Daughter of the Wind that the beginning of a paragraph seemed perfectly languid and calm, but by the paragraph s end all chaos had broken out, and Shabanu s serious, highly structured world descended into disarray Suzanne Fisher Staples writes with moving compassion and total respect for her Pakistani characters, not holding up their behavior to American cultural standards, but rather recognizing that the way society works in the Middle East is very different There are no overtones of judgment on the actions of the characters, even when those actions seem uncaring, cruel or overtly oppressive by American sensibilities It may be hard to swallow the lack of appreciation, objectified personal status and absence of any real control over their own lives that the female Pakistanis have to endure in deference to their male counterparts in this book, but I think that we can all identify to some extent with being controlled and mistreated, and this sympathy allows us to draw closer to the characters and better understand their feelings about the strict Muslim culture in which they live Regardless of the vast differences between American life and that of the Pakistani Muslims of which Shabanu is a member by birth, I found that this book resounded deeply in my soul, the echoes of its sweet strains reminding me even after turning the final page just how much I have emotionally in common with Shabanu This life can be rough no matter where one is born, managing everyone else s expectations for you while trying to keep in stride with where you think your heart s calling you to go, and there are times when outside pressure coalesces to push you down a path that s wrong for you before you even get a chance to find out what you really wanted Shabanu s life is almost destined to proceed down such an incorrect path, in a culture that expects her to be married by the time she turns thirteen and has no intention of letting the choice of who the bridegroom will be fall to her It s a hard thing to be valued by society only for the productivity of one s body, the pursuit of one s own happiness pushed aside as something that should be nothan an afterthought Yet this is the culture in which Shabanu lives, a paradigm that many of us can relate to at least partly in our own lives, and there s little to do but work within the culture and try to pursue one s dreams and happiness in its framework It s surprising, the places in which a happy ending can be found Though she is but eleven years old and her older sister Phulan thirteen, Shabanu pronounced Shah bah noo is nearly at the stage of life when a girl in her culture begins serious planning for her wedding day Phulan is already set to be married within the next several months, and Shabanu s own bridegroom has been chosen long ago he is the younger brother of the seventeen year old who is to marry Phulan, and Shabanu wonders what he looks like now All she remembers from what she saw of him years ago is that he was a boy with funny looking ears poking out from beneath his hat, as if he hadn t yet grown to fit them The boy is fifteen now, though, and surely grown taller and stronger, but will Shabanu s future bridegroom have finally grown into his physique, or will he still have the bodily awkwardness that marked his earlier years Life in the Cholistan Desert can seem grueling and very unfair, as can growing up in a strict Muslim family that never gives Shabanu much slack even though her parents treatment of her is actually quite permissive in comparison to that of most Muslim families , but Shabanu learns to live with the severe restrictions surrounding her and blossom nonetheless Life for an eleven year old girl in Pakistan isn t all serious, after all Shabanu is given the opportunity to play and to take the family s animals out on short excursions, exercising both herself and them as the volatile desert weather permits Even Phulan is sometimes allowed to join Shabanu, though Phulan is considered a growing young woman now and no longer a child who needs to frolic and play to be happy Nevertheless, it is when Shabanu and Phulan are riding camels out on their own that they finally run into trouble too serious to be sidestepped or ignored, trouble that could undo all the careful preparation of the last dozen years for the girls futures and put their entire family in the path of grave danger The trouble could hardly be called Shabanu s fault, but in Pakistani culture these matters are viewed so differently than in America, and it can be very easy for a young girl to be saddled with the blame when well laid plans go awry and her family s future is placed in major jeopardy Is it possible that the future for which Shabanu has waited so long has already gone up in smoke, drifting out of her grasp and fading to nothingness before she ever had the chance to hold and cherish it No matter what happens, you have you That is the important thing And as long as you have you, there is always a choice Sharma, P 217 While there is good to point out about virtually every area of this book, I think that what will stay with me most indelibly years after having read it is the influence of Sharma on the story In a Pakistani nation and culture that seems to downplay the value of females as anything but potential wives and mothers, Sharma exists freely on the outskirts of society with her daughter, Fatima Sharma may live by her own rules, operating outside the boundaries of traditional Muslim culture that bind most Pakistanis so intransigently, but she has a surprisingly keen understanding of that culture, and of what it means to be a girl under such conditions Her advice to Phulan on the morning of her wedding, though it appears to go over Phulan s preoccupied head, is as heartfelt, genuine and affecting as I could have imagined, as if they were words spoken right to me just when I needed to hear them most Sharma has a way of speaking truth at the exact moment when it needs to be heard, whether or not the listener is prepared to accept and internalize it Fold your happiness deep in your heart, she tells Shabanu, as the troubled girl awaits the day that will change both her and Phulan s lives forever Sharma speaks not merely to pacify, or to feed into stereotypes about gender roles and the marriage system in Pakistan, but to prepare Shabanu for the battle coming up just ahead, not worrying about future struggles that may or may not occur after that point Shabanu s options within her family s Muslim society may be limited, but Sharma s wise council shows her that it s a life that can be managed if she s willing, and though the many tomorrows to come will undoubtedly bring their own worries, Shabanu can be ready for whatever happens by using her intelligence and making good choices today And if all else fails, Sharma s unconventional lifestyle is always right there for Shabanu to run to, offering protection and comfort from an uncertain world I m not sure what goals Suzanne Fisher Staples had in mind while writing Shabanu Daughter of the Wind Whatever they were, though, I have to believe that she was supremely successful in accomplishing them A book that sensitively introduces readers to the ins and outs of a vastly different culture, tells a well plotted story with plenty of twists and turns to keep even those with very short attention spans satisfied, and gracefully leads us in a procession of wisdom and understanding toward a greater realization of the meaning of our own lives, is a book that I would read anytime, and one surely deserving of the Newbery Honor bestowed upon Shabanu Daughter of the Wind by the 1990 Newbery Committee I m left with a strong desire to read the author s other books, as well as the feeling that I got evenout of the experience of reading this book than I realize I highly recommend Shabanu Daughter of the Wind, and would consider giving it three and a half stars

  10. says:

    This is a very good YA book and a fascinating look at nomadic life in India Shabanu is a pre teen She prefers to take care of her family s camel herd rather than sit around, cover herself, and talk about weddings like her older and very much engaged sister Most of the novel is about her sister s upcoming wedding and the gathering of a dowry Things go terribly awry and the ending is a major change of plans Also, some great stuff about camels I had no clue they had huge tongues that enlarged This is a very good YA book and a fascinating look at nomadic life in India Shabanu is a pre teen She prefers to take care of her family s camel herd rather than sit around, cover herself, and talk about weddings like her older and very much engaged sister Most of the novel is about her sister s upcoming wedding and the gathering of a dowry Things go terribly awry and the ending is a major change of plans Also, some great stuff about camels I had no clue they had huge tongues that enlarged to impress females or that the males fought to the death sometimes, or that they could dance Truly interesting stuff.However, I HATED the ending I get that it is appropriate for Indian culture and custom, but I was expectingfight from Shabanu Instead, she goes along with her parent s wishes which I felt were just awful I was expectingspit and vinegar from what I thought was a smart girl

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