The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State



Am 3 August 2014 Endet Das Leben, Wie Nadia Murad Es Kannte Truppen Des IS Berfallen Ihr Jesidisches Dorf Kocho Im Norden Iraks Sie T Ten Die Lteren Und Verschleppen Die J Ngeren Kleine Jungen Sollen Als Soldaten Ausgebildet Werden Die M Dchen Werden Verschleppt Und Als Sklavinnen Verkauft An Diesem Tag Verliert Nadia Murad 44 Angeh Rige F R Sie Beginnt Ein Beispielloses Martyrium Drei Monate Ist Sie In Der Gewalt Des IS, Wird Opfer Von Dem Tigung, Folter, Vergewaltigung Nur Mit Gl Ck Und Unvorstellbarem Mut Gelingt Ihr Die Flucht Vor Ihren Peinigern Sie Schafft Es In Ein Fl Chtlingslager Und Kommt Von Dort Aus Nach Deutschland.Tausende Andere Junge Frauen Befinden Sich Bis Heute In Der Gewalt Des IS Deren Stimme Zu Sein Und Sie Zu Befreien Hat Nadia Murad Sich Zur Aufgabe Gemacht Heute K Mpft Sie Daf R, Dass Das Verbrechen Des IS Als V Lkermord Anerkannt Wird Und Die Verantwortlichen Vor Den Internationalen Strafgerichtshof Gestellt Werden.Die Vereinten Nationen Ernannten Nadia Murad Zur Sonderbotschafterin, Dar Ber Hinaus Wurde Sie F R Den Friedensnobelpreis Nominiert Und Mit Dem Vaclav Havel Preises F R Menschenrecht Ausgezeichnet Nun Erz Hlt Sie Ihre Bewegende Geschichte.The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State

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!!> EPUB ✾ The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State ✹ Author Nadia Murad – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 400 pages
  • The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State
  • Nadia Murad
  • German
  • 12 December 2017

10 thoughts on “The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State

  1. says:

    This is a 10 star book written by a very brave young woman persecuted by ISIS, both the men and the women I wish her health, happiness and peace of mind for the rest of her life I had wanted to expand my notes on reading to a proper review, but there are many, so I just wanted to highlight a few areas I don t understand how ISIS can use Yazidi women they capture as sex slaves when although their ISIS interpretation of the Q uran says that unbeliever kuffar women can be used as such, but not Muslim ones, and they forcibly convert them first If they are converted to Islam, how can they be called sabiya sex slaves and raped and sold by many men, sometimes repeatedly in a day I also wanted to share this about illegal immigrants into Europe pretending to be refugees when they are really economic migrants I didn t realise the system was so simple from the illegal immigrant side and how easily duped the European Immigration services were There is no thought whatsoever to try to emigrate legally, it doesn t even occur to them apparently Other than Jilan the girl he loved , he felt like there was nothing for him at home, and since...

  2. says:

    4.5 harrowing, dignified, unfathomable stars 2018 Honorable Mention Read Nadia Murad s story is not unusual and in many parts of the world is quite common Most of us here in the West and much of Europe are currently cocooned from the ATROCITIES that occur daily in our world We complain about the price of hydro, extramarital affairs, ADHD treatments and poor service in the restaurant In fact, in a funny way, this helps us survive and live life day to day However, it does not help much of the world that is not only being oppressed but assaulted, tortured, killed, raped, maimed Most of us have not experienced seeing most of our family shot dead, our homes purposefully burned, our bodies being violated frequently and violently Being treated like a slave, dehumanized, mocked, our souls stomped on Nadia Murad was raised in a village in Northern Iraq near Mount Sinjar She had a very poor but happy childhood with many siblings and half siblings and a fierce and loving mother that did her best to provide for her children after her husband favored another wife and spent most of his attention and love on that family Nadia is a Yazidi, a small nation of people that follow a faith that originated in the 12th century ...

  3. says:

    Q More than anything else, I said, I want to be the last girl in the world with a story like mine c Horror fic writers have nothing on our contemporaries This is a story to illustrate it a story of a girl who went through true horrors and miraculously lived to tell us about it We are supposed to be living in an enlightened and modern and advanced and educated and informed world And it all amounts to nothing, since most vulnerable people out there remain just that, vulnerable, and fall victims while we go on thinking just how great our modernity is Newsflash it isn t It isn t even all that modern, since in this book we can get a tiny and very redacted and sanitised glimpse of horrors, very ancient ones at that Instead, it s plain scary that our supposedly postindustrial and humanistic and diverse and democratic and altogether oh so very enlightened world has allowed such thing from hell as DAESH to happen to our contemporaries Including young and defenceless girls who have pretty much nowhere to run Like Nadia.And the DAESH surely didn t rise from some God cursed sand in some God forgotten desert, on their God forsak...

  4. says:

    It never gets easier to tell your story Each time you speak it, you relive it When I tell someone about the checkpoint where the men raped me, or the feeling of Hajji Salman s whip across the blanket as I lay under it, or the darkening Mosul sky while I search the neighborhood for some sign of help, I am transported back to those moments and all their terror Other Yazidis are pulled back into these memories, too Sometimes even the Yazda members who have listened to my story countless times weep when I tell it it s their story, too Nadia Murad lost her mother and 6 brothers was an Isis sex slave she escaped years of living hell in 2015became a refugee in Germany As a spokesperson. she said my story is the best weapon I have against terrorism Reading Nadia s story is grueling and excruciating World thanks to Nadia for her bravery and service as a human rights activist Her voice is being heard Bless this woman for the difference she is making When at times sh...

  5. says:

    Sometimes it is just hard to fathom all the evil in this world The lengths people will go through, the horror they will inflict on others, for power and creating fear in my view, but claiming it is in the name of religion Such clear writing, such a heartbreaking story, a story that is happening not just in Iraq but in other parts of the world now, and it seems always somewhere This is Nadia s story, but also the story of her family, her village in Northern Iraq, her culture and beliefs as part of the Said community Torn apart, murdered, abused by ISIS, friends, family gone, girls taken used and traded sexually abused as slaves.Yet she rebels in small ways, trying to keep something of herself intact She is a fighter, manages to do what others could not, live to tell the world her story, write her story, make it known to all, what she and her people have suffered I admire her great...

  6. says:

    You should read this book Not because you ll enjoy it, it s not a book meant for enjoying In fact, parts of it, you most certainly will not enjoy You will be upset You will be horrified You may need to take a minute to emotionally recoup.But this is important, y all It s important because, in places like where I live, we tend to act as though genocide and slavery are things of the past We blithely go through life as though those sorts of atrocities are part of a distant and shameful past not the harsh reality of people alive today It s important because, here in America, a lot of folks perceive Iraq as being ISIS, as being the enemy, as being a country of terrorists We fail to understand that many Iraqis are victims trapped by and subjected to the cruelty of ISIS, living daily in fear for their lives and their families lives It s important because Ms Murad is willing to bare herself before all of us, to ...

  7. says:

    Much of this book is extremely hard to read I am not the type who looks at a car wreck I do not look, I flee The August 2014 ISIS attack of the author s northern Iraq Yazidi village and the sexual abuse and beatings that follow are described in excruciating detail For the Yazidi community and for Nadia, religion, ethnicity and family are one They are inseparable, and so the book begins by explaining the myths, customs and beliefs central to the community Understanding their beliefs is essential to understanding the choices they make To those of the Western mindset, many Yazidi beliefs will be perceived as foreign and strange These two factors made reading the book difficult for me, but on completion, I am very glad to have read it Being aware of what is happening in our world today is an individual s responsibility Media reportage informs but is insufficient the book gives depth and reveals the issues at stake.We follow the attack on the village Kocho, the siege and the violence that follows the men are summarily killed, the women, of which Nadia is one, are rounded up, sold as sex slaves, starved, repeatedly raped and beaten by Islamic State militants Her perilous escape is suspensefully told The fate of all those of her extended family is detailed too The book concludes with internment in a refugee camp, emigration to Germany and tells of how she came to speak...

  8. says:

    Sometimes it is just hard to fathom all the evil in this world The lengths people will go through, the horror they will inflict on others, for power and creating fear in my view, but claiming it is in the name of religion Such clear writing, such a heartbreaking story, a story that is happening not just in Iraq but in other parts of the world now, and it seems always somewhere This is Nadia s story, but also the story of her family, her village in Northern Iraq, her culture and beliefs as part of the Said community Torn apart, murdered, abused by ISIS, friends, family gone, girls taken used and traded sexually abused as slaves.Yet she rebels in small ways, trying to keep something of herself intact She is a fighter, manages to do what others could not, live to tell the world her story, write her story, make it known to all, what she and ...

  9. says:

    Powerful, poignant, guaranteed to bring tears to your eyes no matter how tough you think you are, and surprisingly well written The Last Girl is an extraordinary first hand account of a brutal genocide of a small religious minority who had no one to protect them from the barbaric horrors of the Islamic State which grew in power and territory for several long years while moral leadership was absent in this world and this cancer grew unabated The story and sadly it is not a story begins with the Yazidis, a small religious and ethnic group in Western Iraq who lived in small villages in the shadow of Mount Sinjar Persecuted by Saddam for years, they had hope when Iraq was liberated only to see it fall into chaos several years later When Isis grew, no one stepped in to protect them and, even their neighbors turned on them, viciously When Isis finally attacked, thousands fled on foot to the mountain where the terrain was so rough not even food could successfully be airdropped Those who didn t flee where surrounded and either killed in mass graves or enslaved in slave markets and sold and traded again and again And, meanwhile, the entire civilized world could not muster the courage to do something about this evil.It is a very personal tale of a survivor who lost all hope and journeyed through hell, escaping wounded in spirit, her family broken, and little to back to You might think the world would become civilized with each passing year, but barba...

  10. says:

    Well, I won t put this in the military non fiction category because Daesh are a murdering bag of bastards, only good for killing unarmed opposition, and the Yazidi didn t put up a fight I d call this situation a comedy of errors but there is really nothing funny about this tragic situation It s a disaster that everyone contributed to, all the way down the line Ms Murad starts her book with a little family background and fills us in a bit on Yazidism, a religion of which I was previously ignorant and now I find I am merely mystified they pray to a peacock angel Yazidism has no book and is passed on by word of mouth, but it has one great advantage over other religions they don t want you You cannot convert to Yazidism, apparently, so they don t want you No evangelism They are perfectly happy to live in harmony with their neighbours and produce children to help in the field but now we have too many mouths to feed so we need to grow so we need children to work the fieldyou get the picture Anyway, the head wizards over at the ISIS think tank decide that, since the Yazidi have no holy book, they are fair game for killing, raping, basically anything you want to do to them, so they surround the village with what amounts to lightly motorized infantry This is where it could have got interesting, because the Yazidi are armed It seems every Yazidi household has at least one firearm and they love to shoot the...

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