Mountain of the Dead



In January 1959, ten experienced young skiers set out for Mount Otorten in the far north of Russia While one of the skiers fell ill and returned, the remaining nine lost their way and ended up on another mountain slope known as Kholat Syakhl or Mountain of the Dead.On the night of 1 February, something or someone caused the skiers to flee their tent in such terror that they used knives to slash their way out Search parties were sent out and their bodies were found, some with massive internal injuries but no external marks on them The autopsy stated the violent injuries were caused by an unknown elemental force The area was sealed off for years by the authorities and the full events of that night remained unexplained.Using original research carried out in Russia and photographs from the skiers cameras, Keith McCloskey attempts to explain what happened to the nine young people who lost their lives in the mysterious Dyatlov Pass Incident. Read Mountain of the Dead – e17streets4all.co.ukMountain of the Dead

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Mountain of the Dead book, this is one of the most wanted Keith McCloskey author readers around the world.

E-Pub Author Keith McCloskey ✓ Mountain of the Dead  ↠ division ✓ Ebook – e17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 224 pages
  • Mountain of the Dead
  • Keith McCloskey
  • English
  • 13 September 2018
  • 0752491482

10 thoughts on “Mountain of the Dead

  1. says:

    I started reading this book straight after finishing Dead Mountain The True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident by Donnie Eicher.As with Dead Mountain this book is well written and well researched I did notice that there were a quite a few discrepancies in the facts of the story between the two books, but on the whole I prefer this account.Oth...

  2. says:

    Disjointed narrative, repetitive, difficult to follow Made an intriguing case boring to read about, and citing Wikipedia as a source multiple times speaks volumes about the level of research done.

  3. says:

    Don t you just hate it when a book you re enjoying suddenly, and spectacularly falls to bits McCloskey s look at the still mysterious deaths of nine Russian ski hikers in 1959 might be clunkily written but up until chapter 8 of 9 it s still a clear, even handed look at the kind of story that s far too often the natural home of swivel eyed nutjobs who simply can t think properly.The author may make a few too many leaps of logic here and there but in outlining what is known about the group s act Don t you just hate it when a book you re enjoying suddenly, and spectacularly falls to bits McCloskey s look at the still mysterious deaths of nine Russian ski hikers in 1959 might be clunkily written but up until chapter 8 of 9 it s still a clear, even handed look at the kind of story that s far too often the natural home of swivel eyed nutjobs who simply can t think properly.The author may make a few too many leaps of logic here and there but in outlining what is known about the group s activities, and then looking at the major theories including UFOs, murder by special forces troops or escaped Gulag inmates, secret weapon tests, political intrigues or, of course, wolves, bears, yetis and trolls he does a fine job of summarising a genuinely fascinating story in a sensible way.Then, for some reason perhapsbaffling than the incident itself, he hands over that eighth chapter to one of ...

  4. says:

    I was fascinated until the UFO stuff popped up.

  5. says:

    For my Birthday I wanted to treat Myself to something A bitdifferent So the theme I came up with was Arctic Mystery s Some of these case s Have really interested me for a while, the whole. What Why How I ve just finished These so I m going to review them all as one First up we have Mountain of the Dead The Dyatlov Pass Incident by Keith McCloskey The whole incident was a very very strange one I liked this book it covered most of what happened as well as all the theories For my Birthday I wanted to treat Myself to something A bitdifferent So the theme I came up with was Arctic Mystery s Some of these case s Have really interested me for a while, the whole. What Why How I v...

  6. says:

    The Dyatlov Pass Incident happened in February, 1959, in what was then the Soviet Union Nine university students set out for a ski tourism trip and never returned Their frozen, and in at least three cases seriously injured bodies, were found weeks later Their tent was cut open from the inside What could have cause these nine to flee out into the subfreezing Siberian night without shoes or clothes The Soviet officials ruled the cause of death an elemental force, and closed the area to tour The Dyatlov Pass Incident happened in February, 1959, in what was then the Soviet Union...

  7. says:

    If you are drawn to real life mysteries then this one hasthan enough ingredients in it to keep you wondering long after the book is done Better than any fiction but infinitely worse because it really happened, the explanation for the fates of the students who died in the Dyatlov Pass Incident seems unlikely to be resolved anytime soon and in all likelihood may never be The extra ordinary theories postulated almost all have serious evidence in their favo...

  8. says:

    Who has heard of the Dyatlov Pass Incident I had not long before buying this book some time in 2014 I was fascinated by the strange yet tragic events of the case enough to want to buy this book Despite the author admitting that not much evidence exists due to the secretive nature of the events, he has tried to piece together the events and provide an overview of theories.I am not going to provide my own theory as this is a book review Needless to say...

  9. says:

    L incidente del passo Dyatlov uno di quei casi in grado di causare orgasmi multipli a complottisti, appassionati di ufo e di creature leggendarie I fatti, bisogna ammetterlo, sono inquietanti nell inverno del 1959, nove universitari russi anzi, otto un veterano della seconda guerra mondiale , tutti escursionisti esperti, morirono misteriosamente sugli Urali Squarciarono la loro tenda dall interno e fuggirono, scarsamente vestiti e senza scarpe, con una temperatura di venti o trenta gradi s L incidente del passo Dyatlov uno di quei casi in grado di causare orgasmi multipli a complottisti, appassionati di ufo e di creature leggendarie I fatti, bisogna ammetterlo, sono inquietanti nell inverno del 1959, nove universitari russi anzi, otto un veterano della seconda guerra mondiale , tutti escursionisti esperti, morirono misteriosamente sugli Urali Squarciarono la loro tenda dall interno e fuggirono, scarsamente vestiti e senza scarpe, con una temperatura di venti o trenta gradi sotto zero Si fermarono a circa un chilometro e mezzo, raggiungendo degli alberi, e restarono l per un po Cercarono di accendere un fuoco per scaldarsi, e anche di arrampicarsi su un albero, presumibilmente per controllare la situazione all accampamento...

  10. says:

    An engaging exploration into the mysterious, unexplained deaths of nine Russian students who were attempting to summit Mount Otorten which translates as Don t Go There in the local Mansi tribe language in northern Russia in the winter of 1959 The author presents an in depth investigation into the conclusions reached in the official report, offering his opinions on b...

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