Schimb de dame



Schimb De Dame Se Inscrie In Traditia Satirica A Romanului De Campus, Initiata De Kingsley Amis Si Malcom Bradbury, Succesul Sau Fiind Garantat De Reteta Care Se Bazeaza Pe Situatii Conventionale Tratate In Maniera Persiflanta, Pe Utilizarea Parodica A Elementelor Literaturii Sentimentale Sau Senzationale Si, Nu In Ultimul Rind, Pe Destructurarea Discursului Narativ Este Povestea Unui Banal Program Vizind Schimbul De Profesori Intre O Universitate Britanica Si Una Americana, Care Capata Proportii Suprarealiste, Rezultate, Pe De O Parte, Din Socurile Culturale Suferite De Protagonisti, Iar Pe De Alta Din Absorbtia Lor Deplina De Catre Mediile VizateSchimb de dame

Professor David Lodge is a graduate and Honorary Fellow of University College London He is Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, where he taught from 1960 until 1987, when he retired to write full time.He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, was Chairman of the Judges for the Booker Prize for Fiction in 1989, and is the author of numerous works of literary criticism, mainly about the English and American novel, and literary theory He is also the author of The Art of Fiction 1992 , a collection of short articles first published in the Independent on Sunday.David Lodge is a successful playwright and screenwriter, and has adapted both his own work and other writers novels for television His novels include The Picturegoers 1960 , The British Museum is Falling Down 1965 , Changing Places 1975 , Therapy 1995 , Thinks 2001 , and his most recent, Deaf Sentence 2008 He lives in Birmingham.

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  • Hardcover
  • 268 pages
  • Schimb de dame
  • David Lodge
  • Romanian
  • 08 March 2018

10 thoughts on “Schimb de dame

  1. says:

    Changing Places is the first of David Lodge sCampusseries, this one being set in 1969 and published in 1975 The sexual revolution, Vietnam, student sit ins and smoking pot are all highly topical themes the novel is pure psychedelic 60 s The style is redolent of Lodge s dry, sardonic humour, so it is very entertaining to read The setting he has created affords plenty of his waspish observations, so perhaps this is why he is doffing his cap to the Inimitable with his subtitle,A Tale Changing Places is the first of David Lodge sCampusseries, this one being set in 1969 and published in 1975 The sexual revolution, Vietnam, student sit ins and smoking pot are all highly topical themes the novel is pure psychedelic 60 s The style is redolent of Lodge s dry, sardonic humour, so it is very entertaining to read The setting he has created affords plenty of his waspish observations, so perhaps this is why he is doffing his cap to the Inimitable with his subtitle,A Tale of Two Campuses .David Lodge has invented two academic campuses one located in Rummidge , which is clearly intended to be city of Birmingham in the Midlands, and the other is Plotinus, in the state of Euphoria apparently modelled on Berkeley in California The story deals with a six month academic exchange programme between these fictional universities The participants are Philip Swallow, a very dull, conventional British academic, and an American, Morris Zapp, a dynamic and talented American professor Whereas Philip Swallow cannot believe his luck with the comparative luxury of the US University, Zapp is at best amused, and at worst appalled by what appears to him to be a slipshod system of academia in Britain, peopled by amateurs, and with extremely backward living conditions Hence these two academics, both aged 40, have little in common, either in their personalities, or the differing academic systems of their native countries Most of the humour comes from the observations and contrasts resulting from this.It has to be said though, that many of the discrepancies are no longer so pertinent, as in the intervening period British Universities have becomesimilar to their American counterparts, so this novel has inevitably lost a little of its edge Or possibly each succeeding generation of academics worldwide have felt that their,barbed wisecracks sank harmlessly into the protective padding of the new gentle inarticulacy, which had become so fashionable that even the brightest graduate students, ruthless professionals at heart, felt obliged to conform to it Maybe it is not, after all, a clash of cultures which speaks to us now from this novel, but the vague feelings of dissatisfaction each successive generation has that educational standards are somehow dropping.Although it is an entertaining read, and gives the reader a slice of life at the tail end of the sixties, it is not a classic of the period The author gets a little bogged down in the sexual revolution aspect, which feels rather dated There are no great insights here, and when Lodge could get down to the nitty gritty and make observations pointing up the differences between perceptions and cultures, he seems to veer off from doing so Disappointingly, there is no analysis of the differences between the two educational systems, which was the initial starting point of the novel Neither is it consistently witty it seems to lose impetus in the middle, and descend into farcical bed hopping between the academics, their ex academic wives, here would have been a ripe topic forsatire a daughter Melanie, an ex student DJ Charles Boon and so on There are a few memorable laugh out loud scenes though One is an hilarious description of local radio from the American professor Morris Zapp s point of view At the time these regional radio stations were brand new in the UK, but have proliferated since, so that Lodge s witty detailed descriptions are still very astute and funny Another highlight is a very humorous description of the new prefabricated structure of part of Rummidge university The subtitle of the novel isA Tale of Two CampusesIn this way, both the title and subtitle are literary allusions toA Tale of Two Citiesby Charles Dickens Apart from some of the characters names, further similarities to Dickens would be hard to find in the content of the novel, however Ultimately, the reader is left with a sense that, fun read though it is, this novel is a lost opportunity

  2. says:

    Satire the use of wit, especially irony, sarcasm, and ridicule, to criticize faultsFarce a ridiculous situation in which everything goes wrong or becomes a sham Earlier I reviewed Dear Committee Members, a delightfully humorous epistolary novel about a disgruntled professor of creative writing and literature at a small midwestern college in the U.S During the course of a discussion of the book, a GR friend, Esil, mentioned that British writer David Lodge had also written several humorous no Satire the use of wit, especially irony, sarcasm, and ridicule, to criticize faultsFarce a ridiculous situation in which everything goes wrong or becomes a sham Earlier I reviewed Dear Committee Members, a delightfully humorous epistolary novel about a disgruntled professor of creative writing and literature at a small midwestern college in the U.S During the course of a discussion of the book, a GR friend, Esil, mentioned that British writer David Lodge had also written several humorous novels about the academic life Since I have high regard for her opinion I went searching and found a used copy of Changing Places A Tale of Two Campuses published in 1975 You can tell by the five stars that I awarded that I was glad I found the book.It begins this way High, high above the North Pole, on the first day of 1969, two professors of English Literature approached each other at a combined velocity of 1200 miles per hour They were protected from the thin, cold air by the pressurized cabins of two Boeing 707s, and from the risk of collision by the prudent arrangement of the international air corridors.For the next six months the two professors would be changing places as part of an academic exchange program Phillip Swallow was flying from the University of Rummidge located in the English Midlands, clearly based on the University of Birmingham He would seem to be an odd choice for the exchange since he was an unassuming underachiever who had never accomplished anything out of the ordinary and in fact was unpublished The truth is, though he didn t know it, he was selected over muchqualified applicants because his department chair used his influence to ensure his selection He did so, not out of admiration or respect, but because he wanted to promote a younger department member to a position above Swallow and it would be easier if Swallow was out of the country.Morris Zapp, on the other hand, was a well known flamboyant scholar who had written a number of books and was considered to be the authority on Jane Austen He was on the faculty at the University of Euphoria, known locally as Euphoric State, and obviously based on the Berkeley campus of the University of California And as might be expected he was not all that eager to leave the campus by the Bay in order to spend six months in the blue collar Midlands And there were other reasons for his reluctance.Despite being an English Literature professor and a noted authority on Jane Austen, he didn t want to go to England for he always claimed that he had made himself an authority on the literature of England not in spite of but because of never having set foot in the country Besides, he enjoyed shocking his students by admitting that he thought Jane Austen was a pain in the ass.So, why did he make himself a candidate for the exchange program In a word, ego His wife was kicking him out of their home and threatening divorce and he could not tolerate the idea that people would know that it was her idea He did get her to agree to delay the divorce if he left the country for six months which would, he hoped, prevent people from knowing what was transpiring at home The lives of the two professors would become extremely entangled and much too complicated to summarize here Suffice it to say that the title refers to muchthan an exchange of teaching positions.I liked this satirical farce farcical satire , but I wouldn t recommend it to everyone If you like your narratives linear, stay away If you don t like alternating points of view, stay away If you like endings that tie everything up in a nice little package with a bow on top, stay away.The book starts out with a straightforward narrative but later there is a epistolary chapter a chapter of newspaper clippings, excerpts from student manifestoes, and student handouts remember the setting is 1969 and the last chapter is written as a movie screenplay.Since, as it turns out, Changing Places is the first entry in what came to be known as Lodge s Campus Trilogy, which might explain its open ended non conclusion, one could read the other books to see how it all played out for the two professors And I may do that.Finally, in doing a little research I discovered why the novel was set in 1969 and why universities based on Birmingham and Berkeley were chosen as settings It was in that year that an English professor at Birmingham did have the experience of serving as a visiting professor at Berkeley His name was David Lodge

  3. says:

    To everyone who was telling me I should read this you were right, you were right, you were so so right One of my favorite books is Kingsley Amis Lucky Jim, so of course I would love Lodge s academic comedy especially since it comes with the bonus of being set in Birmingham and Berkeley They re not called Birmingham and Berkeley, of course, but if you have any familiarity with either locale, it becomes evenamusing to decode the various place names i.e., Silver Span, Cable Avenue, e To everyone who was telling me I should read this you were right, you were right, you were so so right One of my favorite books is Kingsley Amis Lucky Jim, so of course I would love Lodge s academic comedy especially since it comes with the bonus of being set in Birmingham and Berkeley They re not called Birmingham and Berkeley, of course, but if you have any familiarity with either locale, it becomes evenamusing to decode the various place names i.e., Silver Span, Cable Avenue, etc Further, the way Lodge plays with format epistolary, newspaper clippings, film script is both fun and effective, and there s a delightful amount of meta humor In short, I enjoyed this immensely

  4. says:

    I kept hearing that David Lodge is the funniest author around, that you have to read it, what, you haven t read David Lodge yet, no way, so I decided to finally make acquintances with Lodge through one of his novels and being a trilogy, i took this one to start with The story is alert, dynamic and there was no wasted phrase The story is good, well written I liked the different types of writing letters newspaper cuts a lot of dialogue no dialogue filmscript NOW A BIT OF A SPOILERLod I kept hearing that David Lodge is the funniest author around, that you have to read it, what, you haven t read David Lodge yet, no way, so I decided to finally make acquintances with Lodge through one of his novels and being a trilogy, i took this one to start with The story is alert, dynamic and there was no wasted phrase The story is good, well written I liked the different types of writing letters newspaper cuts a lot of dialogue no dialogue filmscript NOW A BIT OF A SPOILERLodge plays with his readers, he knew that we all waited to see how this elaborate story ends, and then he gave us that ending So I can decide how I want the book to end If anyone of my followers read this one, we could see if our endings match

  5. says:

    It s 1969 and British English Professor Philip Swallow and American English Professor Morris Zap are trading places It s long been a tradition between their two universities to exchange a professor for 6 months.Both of them leave their wives and children behind Both of them have eye opening experiences in their new surroundings.Philip is a quiet, proper, faithful man He s never cheated on his wife of 16 years and he has three kids However, he must admit it IS nice to get away from family lif It s 1969 and British English Professor Philip Swallow and American English Professor Morris Zap are trading places It s long been a tradition between their two universities to exchange a professor for 6 months.Both of them leave their wives and children behind Both of them have eye opening experiences in their new surroundings.Philip is a quiet, proper, faithful man He s never cheated on his wife of 16 years and he has three kids However, he must admit it IS nice to get away from family life for a while And he s always loved America and had a romantic view of the place ever since he honeymooned there 16 years ago.Morris is a cad His second wife is demanding a divorce a divorce that Morris is desperately trying to prevent, hence the trip to England He s not trying to prevent the divorce because he loves his wife, but because he loves his twins a girl named Elizabeth and a boy named Darcy he s an Austen scholar Morris hits on every single female he sees He s cheated on his wife so many times that she s given up even trying to get him to stop or catch him with another woman He sleeps with his students, he sleeps with the babysitter But when his first wife divorced him he lost custody of his daughter, and he is terrified that will happen with the twins, whom he loves dearly.Both men move in opposite directions both geographically and psychologically Philip starts to let his hair down or whatever the male equivalent of this is and gets involved with the American hippies complete with protests, pot, free love, and Black Panthers.Morris on the other hand, makes a vow to be loyal to his wife while he s away in Britainif only to annoy her, not really because he cares He slowly finds himself doing good deeds and becoming a SLIGHTLY less sarcastic, less stuck up person Will keep his vow or will he cheat yet again Both men stumble around in their new surroundings They have to get used to a new culture, a new English department, a new climate, and a new way of doing things.The wives, for their part, are also getting an earful of this new thing called Women s Lib Will this change how they treat their husbands How will the professors deal with this This is a comedy A comedy written in 1975 I personally think David Lodge is hilarious My first exposure to him was when I picked up his book THERAPY at a garage sale for 50 cents and it has become one of my Top 10 Books of All Time This book doesn t disappoint either I was laughing constantly throughout the book David Lodge just writes middle aged men so well and so hilariously I m glad he sticks to the men in this book and doesn t try to speak from the female perspective.Lodge plays around with writing in this book There s one chapter that is made up entirely of letters between the spouses Since I, the reader, know what s going on in the professors real lives, it cracks me up to see what they choose to tell their wives about their experiences and what they decide is best left out.I had a heck of a lot of fun reading this If you are going to read a David Lodge book, I think THERAPY is better than this one, even though this one is great

  6. says:

    Is humour a fragile or robust artform A discussion took place here and one could not hope for aapt example of the issues involved than this book Paul kicked it off with the comment that Comedy may be one of the frailer arts because it depends so much on the immediate cultural situation Some of the best comedy does indeed depend on the immediate situation around it and its life span is sadly short as a consequence Culturally referenced comedy Is humour a fragile or robust artform A discussion took place here and one could not hope for aapt example of the issues involved than this book Paul kicked it off with the comment that Comedy may be one of the frailer arts because it depends so much on the immediate cultural situation Some of the best comedy does indeed depend on the immediate situation around it and its life span is sadly short as a consequence Culturally referenced comedy less so than political, which is breathtaking in its immediacy here today, gone tomorrow but still fashion dependent culture of the moment, certainly will suffer the same fate.Here we have a book, a comedy, firmly locked into its period of approximately 1970 The humour resulting from that is the shakiest part of the book Incipient women s lib, ban the bomb hippies, the emergent sexual revolution I m guessing if you didn t live through it, or were close enough for it to be in the ethos still this would not be particularly amusing At the same time, we have the central theme of the book which is academia, how it functions and behaves and this is really awfully funny And so far it remains timeless Yes, I do want to say that Right now I d say it is timeless, but surely, I mean, really, surely, it can t remain so Because the implication that nothing has changed over the last forty years in terms of the inadequacies of academia, on which the humour is based, is well, a bit shocking, really These days I d say we would be pretty embarrassed by the very term women s lib, we wish our parents hadn t been hippies, marijuana is not exactly flavour of the month and if we talk about uni students having sex, we would not dare say with the opposite sex It goes without saying that a uni student might have sex withor less anything Animal, vegetable, mineral, I imagine The presumptuousness of the opposite sex would be humourlessly politically incorrect.And yet, when Lodge speaks of academia, it is a frozen world in which nothing has changed Indeed, even though it is set in that period where something that might have seemed momentous was happening students insisting on being part of the system, not merely the object of it it still has not aged one bit I wonder if the students realise how becoming part of the system has not changed it in the least So, much as I spent this book giggling and chuckling and snorting with laughter, at the same time it niggled me to think that the things he sends up, so obviously in need of reform, have not changed one tiny bit I m astonished by academia s capacity to protect itself from outside interference and judgement Astonished that it doesn t see, as the self regulatory community it evidently is, that things should change Or, perhaps, sees but does nothing, islike it.Well, maybe one thing has changed in that world Part of the outmoded humour is based on sex, and the involvements real and hoped for and fantasised about by academics lusting after students However much this is still in their hearts, maybe it is not, these days, talked about so often, or proferred as a source of humour Yes I m only guessing, but the ugly threat of sexual harrassment, althoughoffputting, I expect, to the school teacher, must also be an issue for the academic.In Australia one has only to think of the money reaped by Helen Garner for The First Stone The First Stone is at once an account of one of Australia s most explosive sexual harassment cases and an investigation into the soul of sexual politics To provide the framework for her inquiry, Helen Garner takes the very public case of a University of Melbourne college master accused of sexual harassment by two of his students After reading about the charge in the newspaper, Garner, a longtime feminist, impulsively wrote a letter of support to the accused man The letter was made public and in the wake of much criticism over her support of the man, Garner set out to explore the women s claims Along the way she uncovers issues that challenge her notions of feminism, political activism, gender relations, and power dynamics With a journalist s eye for detail, Garner leads the reader into a riveting examination of the nature of sex and power in contemporary society really do like a no holds barred approach to humour and yet there are things that somehow seem to be humorous in one period and repugnant in another I go to a lot of old musicals, 1940s and 1950s A routine part of the humour is violence against women jokes about it, not the act itself I can only suppose that what made it funny once was that we didn t believe in it, whereas now that we know it really exists, it is not possible to find it funny I m not quite suggesting this pertains to Lodge, but I do wonder if what further decades will do to the legitimacy of his humour here and there.Well, one thing we do know His wonderful observations about the academic world will not have changed in their impact, whatever else might, and since it is the important part of his work, surely it will continue to be timeless.It makes me think of the Rumpole books My gut feeling is that they will never date and when one asks why that is, the answer is just the same The legal system is evenable to protect itself from change than academia It doesn t change and therefore the humour does not lose its punch Think of the cutting observations of the processes of the law Dickens makes in Bleak House and how completely pertinent they seem today We find them amusing because everything is still as it always was Thus with the law, and thus, it would so appear, with academia I wonder what the historical antecedent to Lodge s books are Or and this just comes to me maybe academia did change and Lodge documented it Maybe in some dim dark past, it was a community of idealistic scholars on a search for the truth Is that possible Oh stop laughing, would you

  7. says:

    One of the advantages of a reading group is that you are forced really much too harsh a word to read books you ve always meant to and that many people have recommended but that you ve just never gotten around to Such was the case with David Lodge s Changing Places What a delight This is one of the funniest books I have read in a long time It chronicles the events in the lives of two professors, Philip Swallow, of Rummidge College in England, and Morris Zapp, professor of English at Euphori One of the advantages of a reading group is that you are forced really much too harsh a word to read books you ve always meant to and that many people have recommended but that you ve just never gotten around to Such was the case with David Lodge s Changing Places What a delight This is one of the funniest books I have read in a long time It chronicles the events in the lives of two professors, Philip Swallow, of Rummidge College in England, and Morris Zapp, professor of English at Euphoric State University, the Jane Austen expert whose ambition it is to write the definitive work in multiple volumes summarizing all that has been and could be said or written about Jane Austen They are participating in an exchange program Morris discovers, after wondering what the odds are that he could be the only male on a planeload of women flying to England, that it is a special charter flight for pregnant women on their way to England for abortions He then has the misfortune to wander into a striptease club and to discover he is the only one there where the artiste is Mary Makepeace, his seatmate from the plane who decided not to go throughwith the abortion Of course, she recognizes him and it s all downhill from there.Phillip, meanwhile, grants special permission to a student to enter his class late, only to have the student lead the entire class out on strike it takes place during the sixties no offense intended Lodge makes constant spirited fun of all the academic stereotypes One of many favorite scenes takes place in Zapp s lodging house, where the young daughter of his landlord has gotten ahold of Zapp s Playboy Zapp, of course, would like it back, but Shea, his landlord, retorts he has destroyed the magazine The skeptical Zapp didn t believe him Inside thirty minutes he would be holed up somewhere, jerking himself off and drooling over the Playboy pix Not the girls, of course, but the full colour ads for whiskey and hi fi equipment

  8. says:

    Lodge s Changing Places is the first novel in his Campus Trilogy It follows a very simple story or perhaps formula or script areappropriate terms two professors, one from the United States and the other from England, exchange positions and fill their counterpart s teaching position for six months They also end up sleeping with each other s wives.Contrary to expectations, the story was not particularly funny or revealing It felt rather uneven undeveloped in some places and overdevelop Lodge s Changing Places is the first novel in his Campus Trilogy It follows a very simple story or perhaps formula or script areappropriate terms two professors, one from the United States and the other from England, exchange positions and fill their counterpart s teaching position for six months They also end up sleeping with each other s wives.Contrary to expectations, the story was not particularly funny or revealing It felt rather uneven undeveloped in some places and overdeveloped in others Nor was the style successful to go from relatively straightforward storytelling to epistles to news bulletins and finally to film script might work theoretically, in some cases not in this one I think that the news bulletins especially killed what little interest I had in the flow of events I could see what Lodge was doing at times it is almost painfully clear but what he was doing simply failed to arouse serious response or passion I will read the subsequent two novels of the Campus Trilogy, but with dampened expectations and enthusiasm, I m afraid

  9. says:

    Taken as a whole, the writing and the concept were both novel The simultaneous and similar incidents that happened to Philip and Morris were funny and the way David narrated them are simply entertaining The drama script format in the final chapter would really gave an idea to those who read and liked this that this is cut for a movie or a sitcom which I read in Wikipedia to really have happened in the 70s Although it is now dated there was no computer yet and there was a mention of electri Taken as a whole, the writing and the concept were both novel The simultaneous and similar incidents that happened to Philip and Morris were funny and the way David narrated them are simply entertaining The drama script format in the final chapter would really gave an idea to those who read and liked this that this is cut for a movie or a sitcom which I read in Wikipedia to really have happened in the 70s Although it is now dated there was no computer yet and there was a mention of electric typewriter this will be bound to an entertaining read especially for the academe

  10. says:

    Incredibly amusing, alert, witty but unpretentious at the same time, though, being part of a campus novel trilogy, someone might expect a lot of academia breathing through its pages The plot is quite obvious, due to the title, Philip British and Morris American are supposed to exchange places as English Literature professors for 6 months But since life always takes us by surprise, they change not only positions and it s a good opportunity for Lodge to use his own experience in order to emp Incredibly amusing, alert, witty but unpretentious at the same time, though, being part of a campus novel trilogy, someone might expect a lot of academia breathing through its pages The plot is quite obvious, due to the title, Philip British and Morris American are supposed to exchange places as English Literature professors for 6 months But since life always takes us by surprise, they change not only positions and it s a good opportunity for Lodge to use his own experience in order to emphasize the cultural mental differences between America and England.While reading, I was a bit disappointed about the final chapter He uses the film script format, with a lot of cuts, camera close ups and focusing, which made it a bit difficult to follow Now I see it as a last tribute to sunny California read Hollywood not sure this was Lodge s intention, though and with a little bit of imagination it turns out to be quite hilarious Speaking of film scripts, besides the classical narrative, he also uses the epistolary style in one of the chapters, plus newspapers clippings in another techniques which also gave dynamism to the novel

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