Our Tempestuous Day



Regency England Has Long Been Seen As A Time Of Hedonism And Romance, When Dashing Beaux And Elegant Belles Played Out Their Flirtations Against A Backdrop Of Opulence And Style Yet Beneath The Surface Glitter Of The Regency Lay An Underlying Malaise, A Pervasive Hollowness And Sense Of Loss, Along With An Explosive Undercurrent Of Popular Unrest And Political Radicalism.It Was Indeed A Tempestuous, Quicksilver Era, Haunted By War And The Human Wreckage Of War, And By Fears Of Luddite Violence And Risings Of The Overtaxed, Underfed Poor A Time Of Financial Uncertainty When Fortunes Were Made And Lost Amid High Risk And The Ever Present Specter Of Bankruptcy.And It Was, Memorably, A Time Studded With Larger Than Life Personalities The Aged King In His Slow Decline Into Delusion The Flamboyant Prince Regent In His Extravagant Brighton Pavilion The Duke Of Wellington, Hero Of Waterloo The Debauched, Tragically Fissured Lord Byron, Hero To The Women Of Fashionable London These And Many Others Are Brought To Vibrant Life In This Wide Ranging, Captivating Social History A History As Dramatic As The Times Themselves.Our Tempestuous Day

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Our Tempestuous Day book, this is one of the most wanted Carolly Erickson author readers around the world.

[[ PDF / Epub ]] ★ Our Tempestuous Day  Author Carolly Erickson – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 302 pages
  • Our Tempestuous Day
  • Carolly Erickson
  • English
  • 22 March 2018
  • 0688060862

10 thoughts on “Our Tempestuous Day

  1. says:

    On the one hand, this is a fascinating look at what you could call the other side of the Regency era taking Georgette Heyer as popularizer of its bright, fashionable, elevated side Erickson tells a story, and it reads like a story, spanning the years of the Regency, 1811 to 1820, touching on some of itsinteresting characters as well as the political climate that Heyer ignores It s at the very least eye opening, and there were a few events, such as the Peterloo massacre, that it put i On the one hand, this is a fascinating look at what you could call the other side of the Regency era taking Georgette Heyer as popularizer of its bright, fashionable, elevated side Erickson tells a story, and it reads like a story, spanning the years of the Regency, 1811 to 1820, touching on some of itsinteresting characters as well as the political climate that Heyer ignores It s at the very least eye opening, and there were a few events, such as the Peterloo massacre, that it...

  2. says:

    Kudos, Erickson This was both enlightening and entertaining Beginning at the end of The Mad King George s reign and ending around the death of Princess Charlotte, it encompasses the military triumphs, the literary accomplishment, and the monarchical shenanigans during the regency of George, Prince of Wales This is an excellent source for anyone interested in Lord Byron He s discussed quite a bit through a few chapters Such a mercurial character Another interesting personality is Princess Ch Kudos, Erickson This was both enlightening and entertaining Beginning at the end of The Mad King George s reign and ending around the death of Princess Charlotte, it encompasses the military triumphs, the literary accomplishment, and the monarchical shenanigans during the regency of George, Prince of Wales This is an excellent source for anyone interested in Lord Byron He s discussed quite a bit through a few chapters Such a mercurial character Another interesti...

  3. says:

    A good overview of life during the regency years, however, it lacks depth.

  4. says:

    Carolly Erickson is not one of my absolute favorite historians, as I feel that she tends to skim over the top a bit, but she s definitely up there for her chatty, conversational style and her knack of picking out interesting anecdotes that somehow frame an era Our Tempestuous Day is no different, taking the Regency and picking out several anecdotes like the Peterloo massacre, Waterloo, the fight over the installation of the Regency in the first place, and the death of King George III and using Carolly Erickson is not one of my absolute favorite historians, as I feel that she tends to skim over the top a bit,...

  5. says:

    Another audible purchase A decent overview of the Regency period 1810 1820 in the UK from the top down Although the book covered movements such as the Luddites and the Peterloo massacre, and discussed the Corn Laws but hardly anything on the anti slavery movement , you could tell that the author s real passion is discussing royalty and the aristocracy, and you will hear every tiring detail about the Prince Regent So if you are in to that it is interesting and somewhat salacious you w Another audible purchase A decent overview of the Regency period 1810 1820 in the UK from the top down Although the book covered movements such as the Luddites and the Peterloo massacre, and discussed the Corn Laws but hardly anything on the anti slavery movement , you could...

  6. says:

    After reading many books about the particulars of life in the Regency, this book was an appreciated overview of the politics and major events that were actually happening during the period I would have liked some de...

  7. says:

    A fun, breezy popular history of a thoroughly demented era with information and anecdotes about life amongst the downtrodden, the royals, and the Napoleonic wars.

  8. says:

    A good brief overview of the Regency period The author covers the main features of the time the social unrest, the Regent himself, attitudes to women, etc , by using contemporary sources I read this as an adjunct to thefocussed histories of the period and found it...

  9. says:

    Parts of this were really enlightening The whole perspective on Lord Byron and King George IV s love of Brighton make Austen s book settingsinteresting However, parts dragged on Such is history But in the end, I liked it enough to finish it.

  10. says:

    Parts of this were really enlightening The whole perspective on Lord Byron and King George IV s love of Brighton make Austen s book settingsinteresting However, parts dragged on Such is history But in the end, I liked it enough to finish it.

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