The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration



[Read] ➱ The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration Author Robert D. Ballard – E17streets4all.co.uk Until a few decades ago, the ocean depths were almost as mysterious and inaccessible as outer space Oceans cover two thirds of the earth s surface with an average depth of than two miles yet humans ha Darkness: A PDF/EPUB ç Until a few decades ago, the ocean depths were almost as mysterious The Eternal ePUB Æ and inaccessible as outer space Oceans cover two thirds of the earth s Eternal Darkness: A MOBI ï surface with an average depth of than two miles yet humans had never ventured than a few hundred feet below the waves One of the great scientific and archaeological feats of our time has been finally to cast light on the eternal darkness of the deep sea This is the story of that achievement, told by the man who has done than any other to make it possible Robert Ballard Ballard discovered the wreck of the Titanic He led the teams that discovered hydrothermal vents and black smokers cracks in the ocean floor where springs of superheated water support some of the strangest life forms on the planet He was a diver on the team that explored the mid Atlantic ridge for the first time, confirming the theory of plate tectonics Today, using a nuclear submarine from the US Navy, he s exploring the ancient trade routes of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea for the remains of historic vessels and their cargo In this book, he combines science, history, spectacular illustrations, and first hand stories from his own expeditions in a uniquely personal account of how twentieth century explorers have pushed back the frontiers of technology to take us into the midst of a world we could once only guess at Ballard begins inwith William Beebe and Otis Barton, pioneers of the ocean depths who made the world s first deep sea dives in a cramped steel sphere He introduces us to Auguste and Jacques Piccard, whose Bathyscaphdescended into the lowest point on the ocean floor He reviews the celebrated advances made by Jacques Cousteau He describes his own major discoveries from sea floor spreading to black smokers as well as his technical breakthroughs, including the development of remote operated underwater vehicles and the revolutionary search techniques that led to the discovery and exploration of the Titanic, the Nazi battleship Bismarck, ancient trading vessels, and other great ships Readers will come away with a richer understanding of history, earth science, biology, and marine technology and a new appreciation for the remarkable men and women who have explored some of the most remote and fascinating places on the planet Washington Post Book World.The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration

Darkness: A PDF/EPUB ç Robert Duane Ballard born June , in Wichita, Kansas is a The Eternal ePUB Æ former commander in the United States Navy and an oceanographer who is most Eternal Darkness: A MOBI ï noted for his work in underwater archaeology He is most famous for the discoveries of the wrecks of the RMS Titanic in , the battleship Bismarck in , and the wreck of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown in Most recently he discovered the wreck of John F Kennedy s PT in and visited the Solomon Islander natives who saved its crew Ballard is also great grandson of American Old West lawman Bat Mastersonom wikipediasee alsohttp literati Ballard.

The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea
    The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea ventured than a few hundred feet below the waves One of the great scientific and archaeological feats of our time has been finally to cast light on the eternal darkness of the deep sea This is the story of that achievement, told by the man who has done than any other to make it possible Robert Ballard Ballard discovered the wreck of the Titanic He led the teams that discovered hydrothermal vents and black smokers cracks in the ocean floor where springs of superheated water support some of the strangest life forms on the planet He was a diver on the team that explored the mid Atlantic ridge for the first time, confirming the theory of plate tectonics Today, using a nuclear submarine from the US Navy, he s exploring the ancient trade routes of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea for the remains of historic vessels and their cargo In this book, he combines science, history, spectacular illustrations, and first hand stories from his own expeditions in a uniquely personal account of how twentieth century explorers have pushed back the frontiers of technology to take us into the midst of a world we could once only guess at Ballard begins inwith William Beebe and Otis Barton, pioneers of the ocean depths who made the world s first deep sea dives in a cramped steel sphere He introduces us to Auguste and Jacques Piccard, whose Bathyscaphdescended into the lowest point on the ocean floor He reviews the celebrated advances made by Jacques Cousteau He describes his own major discoveries from sea floor spreading to black smokers as well as his technical breakthroughs, including the development of remote operated underwater vehicles and the revolutionary search techniques that led to the discovery and exploration of the Titanic, the Nazi battleship Bismarck, ancient trading vessels, and other great ships Readers will come away with a richer understanding of history, earth science, biology, and marine technology and a new appreciation for the remarkable men and women who have explored some of the most remote and fascinating places on the planet Washington Post Book World."/>
  • Paperback
  • 408 pages
  • The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration
  • Robert D. Ballard
  • English
  • 10 August 2019
  • 069109554X

10 thoughts on “The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration

  1. says:

    No doubt there are still people especially older ones, long out of public school who haven t heard of black smokers and who believe as everyone used to that all of life on earth depends directly or indirectly on photosynthesis Though one can never overestimate the power of public education in America to get things wrong, I m pretty sure that younger people now know better, because the basic biology textbooks had to be rewritten after Robert Ballard and his colleagues discovered, in 1979, un No doubt there are still people especially older ones, long out of public school who haven t heard of black smokers and who believe as everyone used to that all of life on earth depends directly or indirectly on photosynthesis Though one can never overestimate the power of public education in America to get things wrong, I m pretty sure that younger people now know better, because the basic biology textbooks had to be rewritten after Robert Ballard and his colleagues discovered, in 1979, undersea ecosystems that were clustered around hydrothermal vents black smokers and were using chemical energy, not light energy, to sustain life Though I see in glancing back at the published text via Google Books I read an advance draft that Ballard mentions that chemosynthetic bacteria were already known to exist in rare, isolated instances, I think it s still true that Ballard s discovery transformed biology, because it was now possible to imagine that life itself had originated in this way, in the depths of the oceans, and that photosynthesis arose later, or at least independently.That s only one of the ways in which Ballard has contributed to altering our understanding of the planet we live on, much of which is summarized in this book The publisher s summary is pretty accurate, and I won t recap it, but I can take issue with its claim that Ballard has donethan any other man to cast light on the eternal darkness of the deep sea You might draw that conclusion, and it s not unreasonable, but the tale Ballard tells makes clear that the work of discovery in the oceans isn t solitary, even if it depends on singular minds for its progress You d do better to conclude and this is probably what he d hope, for he s a modest man that he didn t find the Titanic alone, that Beebe and Barton and the Picards and many others were a part of it.I already knew the outlines of this story, having learned it in bits and pieces over the years, but having it all recounted succinctly in one book was a refreshing reminder Though the temptation to put simplifying labels on things is regrettable, you wouldn t be amiss in calling the last 100 years the century of oceanography Read Ballard s book and you ll know why

  2. says:

    It s no secret that my knowledge base isn t very deep in any area of science In fact, there s very little I do comprehend Unfortunately, this was very apparent while I was reading the book Many of the stories and sites Ballard would describe were beyond my grasp because I had so much trouble understanding and picturing what it was he was talking about From ballast to microorganism, I had trouble I don t know if I ll ever know whether this is due to his writing above my head or me just being It s no secret that my knowledge base isn t very deep in any area of science In fact, there s very little I do comprehend Unfortunately, this was very apparent while I was reading the book Many of the stories and sites Ballard would describe were beyond my grasp because I had so much trouble understanding and picturing what it was he was talking about From ballast to microorganism, I had trouble I don t know if I ll ever know whether this is due to his writing above my head or me just being too far below his writing This should not take anything away from the book, however It did leave me wanting to knowabout the ocean and submersibles and wishing that I could understand everything he was talking about And, while I never remember feeling the desire to go to the moon or space, I found myself often hoping for the chance to go deep into the ocean Of course, part of that is because the idea of looking for old shipwrecks history sounds amazingly fun

  3. says:

    Both an amazing history book and a fascinating memoir of someone who was there for the golden age of sea exploration If you do pick this up and read it, oh my God with the bologna sandwiches, am I right

  4. says:

    Eternal Darkness is a pretty fascinating account of deep sea exploration from one of the pioneers of the field He writes about some of the early technology that was developed to explore the deep oceans It is mind boggling to think how space exploration had really got ahead of deep ocean exploration He describes many of the early deep ocean exploring vessels as well as some of the early pioneers you have all heard of Jacques Cousteau, but there are many others I didn t know about, and in fac Eternal Darkness is a pretty fascinating account of deep sea exploration from one of the pioneers of the field He writes about some of the early technology that was developed to explore the deep oceans It is mind boggling to think how space exploration had really got ahead of deep ocean exploration He describes many of the early deep ocean exploring vessels as well as some of the early pioneers you have all heard of Jacques Cousteau, but there are many others I didn t know about, and in fact Cosusteau was further down the line What makes it really interesting is he is one of these early pioneers Deep exploration really got going in the 60 s It is mind boggling to think that scientific concepts we view without question now, like plate tectonics, were discovered and reinforced by the diving experiments and exploration done by these early deep diving craft I was constantly amazed by the willingness of those who choose to climb into these craft and go deep, miles down into the cold, darkness of the deep oceans The book covers a period from the 60 s mostly to the early 90 s Ballard of course, is part of the group that located the Titanic If you are looking for a book on that discovery you will really want to look for something else He covers it as much as he covers other wrecks he was involved in discovering over the years, it is not the focus of the book at all The only reason I didn t give it 5 stars is I felt it might be a little advanced for those without some background knowledge of the sciences There were a few things I had to look up elsewhere to understand He talks to you and shows you underwater pictures like you understand exactly what all these geological formations are, and why they are important He gets a little too technical in some spots, kind of like when you talk to your engineer friends You areinterested in the questions of what did it feel like, what did you see, how did you feel, and they want to go on about the strength and limitations of electrical wiring in underwater cables.But that being said, I found it a fascinating book I learnedthan I ever did about deep sea submersibles, as well about some shipwrecks I didn t know about, and early scientific exploration of the deep sea, which now shapesof our understanding of how the world works

  5. says:

    Science Cowriter William R Hively Learn a lot about deep sea explorations, the mysteries of the deep Amazing flora, fauna just bizarre Great fantasizing a journey to the depths of our oceans.

  6. says:

    This is a great overview of deep diving submersibles It does a great job of developing the history of the submersible and its major contributions to science and the military It also lays out the grounds for how Ballard sees the future of this technology I enjoyed the descriptions of the discoveries of the Mid Ocean Ridge and black smokers I wish that he would have described the Titanic discovery indetail Sometimes I felt that he dumbed down some of the science to reach a younger crowd This is a great overview of deep diving submersibles It does a great job of developing the history of the submersible and its major contributions to science and the military It also lays out the grounds for how Ballard sees the future of this technology I enjoyed the descriptions of the discoveries of the Mid Ocean Ridge and black smokers I wish that he would have described the Titanic discovery indetail Sometimes I felt that he dumbed down some of the science to reach a younger crowd, but he still did an amazing job of leaving me wanting to knowabout the deep ocean and what remains to be discovered

  7. says:

    The sandwich story was pretty much epic I was also fairly entertained by the historical aspect put forth regarding deep sea exploration One thing that really bothered me though was his perhaps detached writing about the Titanic, I just really felt like he could have emotionally connectedwith the audience on that bit Also some of his other dives, and what it really feels like to be there I think anyone picking up a book like this would want that Still it was enjoyable, and I definitely The sandwich story was pretty much epic I was also fairly entertained by the historical aspect put forth regarding deep sea exploration One thing that really bothered me though was his perhaps detached writing about the Titanic, I just really felt like he could have emotionally connectedwith the audience on that bit Also some of his other dives, and what it really feels like to be there I think anyone picking up a book like this would want that Still it was enjoyable, and I definitely was not bored by it It had a lot of good content overall

  8. says:

    Imagine that we knowabout planets millions of miles away than we do about the first 2 miles of ocean Amazing what may be out there This book is about the history of deep sea diving Some successes and some failures But with each we are learning Technology has help as we further explore the last frontier Good overall story Through the years there was a very interesting shift from manned submersables to virtual or robotic exploration Imagine what a shift this and it occurred only in Imagine that we knowabout planets millions of miles away than we do about the first 2 miles of ocean Amazing what may be out there This book is about the history of deep sea diving Some successes and some failures But with each we are learning Technology has help as we further explore the last frontier Good overall story Through the years there was a very interesting shift from manned submersables to virtual or robotic exploration Imagine what a shift this and it occurred only in the 1980s and 90s

  9. says:

    I picked up this book just to read two chapters for research, but once I got started I could not stop Ballard writes science very understandably for the non scientist I learned a lot from this book and really enjoyed it Oceanography is really fascinating and this book has made me want to know

  10. says:

    Ballard s story of exploration is very compelling I enjoyed the personal stake he has in the events described it lends a narrative structure to what would otherwise be a fascinating but scientifically focused work.

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