Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle



In Jazz, As In So Many Arts, Journeymen And Journeywomen Gravitate Toward Manhattan, The Proving Ground And Graveyard Of The Music World But Most Of Them Get Their Start In Local Scenes, Which Tend To Remain Undocumented Along With The Players Who Populate Them In Jackson Street After Hours, Paul De Barros Takes A Meticulous, Affectionate Look At One Such Scene That Thrived In Seattle During The 1940s And 1950s Part Of The Fun Comes From Seeing Legends Say, Ray Charles Or Quincy Jones In Their Pre Legendary State, Scrapping For A Decent Gig But Even Better Are The Oral History Bits, Like The One In Which Ernestine Anderson Discovers Her True Vocation When I Went To Audition At The Eldorado Ballroom, The Piano Player Asked Me What Key Did I Do These Two Songs That I Knew In I Automatically Said C It Turned Out To Be The Wrong Key So I Improvised Around The Melody, Because My Grandmother Had Told Me That If I Wanted To Be A Professional Singer, Once You Start Singing, You Don T Stop When I Finished, One Of The Musicians Told Me I Was A Jazz Singer.Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle book, this is one of the most wanted Paul De Barros author readers around the world.

➽ Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle Free ➳ Author Paul De Barros – E17streets4all.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 238 pages
  • Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle
  • Paul De Barros
  • English
  • 15 September 2019
  • 0912365927

10 thoughts on “Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots Of Jazz In Seattle

  1. says:

    A mixed bag, mainly of interest to jazz history buffs and Seattleites The worst thing about this book is its non standard size it s just too floppy It gets a bit tedious at times, since one of the reasons for this book s existence is to document and give credit where credit is due every jazz musician who ever played a lick in the early Seattle jazz scene So it s page after page of this n that guy s progress from one band to another, one gig to another, moving to L.A and back, to N A mixed bag, mainly of interest to jazz history buffs and Seattleites The worst thing about this book is its non standard size it s just too floppy It gets a bit tedious at times, since one of the reasons for this book s existence is to document and give credit where credit is due every jazz musician who ever played a lick in the early Seattle jazz scene So it s page after page of this n that guy s progress from one band to another, one gig to another, moving to L.A and back, to N.Y and back, and the guy s reminiscences and opinions of cats he played with and joints he gigged at.But there are occasional interesting nuggets, and many are about the city, not the musicians For instance, Bertha Landes was mayor of Seattle in the 1920s and the book documents her campaigns to shut down the popular dance halls of the day She was a clean up the town official during Prohibition, busting clubs with frequency and enthusiasm This makes me smile wryly when I attend meetings in City Hall s Bertha Landes room.If I was diligent I d be writing down the names of these cats what sound appealing and be hunting for their old recordings I did, in fact find a terrible quality mp3 download of a concert by the Cecil Young Quartet onThe music is pretty fun, too bad it was digitized from a scratched and skippy vinyl disk But check out Who Parked the Car if you get a chance.In the end it was a worthwhile read, and I learned a lot Influential but now unknown names like Bumps Blackwell, Pony Poindexter and Neil Friel are now at home in my head It was also fun learning the popular but long gone venues back in the day the Trianon Ballroom, the Black and Tan Club, the New Chinatown, the Rocking Chair, the 908 Club, the Mardi Gras, the Savoy Ballroom, Pete s Poop Deck, the Llahngaelhyn.Not an insignificant portion of the narrative shines a light on Seattle s history of race relations It was interesting learning about the separate black and white musician s unions, and how a Seattle musician successfully defeated proposed legislation to outlaw interracial marriage.Finally, ts impossible to read this book for long without missing the excitement, hubris and fellowship of playing music in bands

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